Kevin Gregg walks five in ugly blown save

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Kevin Gregg imploded last night, blowing a 5-3 lead against the Rays by allowing four runs on one hit and five walks. He also committed a throwing error and uncorked a wild pitch in one of the ugliest outings you’ll see this season. And then just for good measure he got ejected for yelling at the home plate umpire while walking off the mound.
Gregg came into the game with 14 saves in 16 chances, but he’s been shaky for a while now. Even before Tuesday’s disaster he’d allowed seven runs over his last 10 games, with a 9/8 K/BB ratio and .361 opponents’ batting average in 9.1 innings.
Gregg had plenty of memorably hideous blown saves for the Cubs and Marlins before signing with the Blue Jays, but manager Cito Gaston gave little indication afterward whether he’s in danger of losing ninth-inning duties quite yet. Jason Frasor or Scott Downs would be next in line.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”