Joe Maddon gets steamed, gets ejected

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Maddon Hernandez Pena arguing.jpgIn hindsight, the biggest shocker of the whole ninth inning exchange between Carlos Pena, Joe Maddon and home plate umpire Angel Hernandez in last night’s Rays-Jays game was that Kevin Gregg threw a strike. But we’ll cover Gregg’s nightmare night later this morning.  For now, let’s talk about the rhubarb.

In case you missed it, Carlos Pena had a 2-2 count on him and called for time just as Gregg was going into his windup.* Hernandez didn’t grant it, Gregg pitched, and Pena — out of his stance and bat at his side — half-heartedly offered at what came in for strike three. The whole sequence can be seen here.

*Note: the MLB.com video starts a couple of seconds too late to tell for sure, but it’s not at all clear that Pena was calling for time before Gregg actually went into motion. He certainly had his hand up as Gregg was winding up, but we can’t tell if he had been calling time before that. If anyone out there was watching the game live and can weigh in on this, please do so in the comments.

Joe Maddon was clearly perturbed that Hernandez chose that moment — one out in the
ninth inning as the Rays are mounting a rally — to enforce baseball’s
new get-tough policy on speeding up the game. He gave Hernandez an earful over it and then walked down the line to give crew chief Joe West an earful as well, telling him “This is your [bleeping] fault!” no doubt referring to West’s crusade to speed up games via any and all methods short of calling a reasonable strike zone.

I understand Maddon’s frustration.  I think umps should be more stingy about allowing timeouts — and if Pena really wasn’t calling for it before Gregg was in his windup, forget it — but the ninth inning of a tense game is not the time to start denying guys time.  Consistency is key, and based on what all the parties to the dustup were saying after the game, Hernandez’s time-out policy was not consistent.

Just another item on the agenda for baseball’s umpire czar Mike Port, I suppose.  Between West’s and Bob Davidson’s antics last week, Bill Hohn’s on Monday and this business last week, Port has been a pretty busy guy lately.

Zach Britton’s consecutive saves streak has ended at 60

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On September 20, 2015, Zach Britton blew a save against the Rays. Little did he know that he wouldn’t blow another save until August 23, 2017, converting 60 consecutive save opportunities.

Britton took the mound with a 7-5 lead in the top of the ninth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Athletics. He yielded a single to Jed Lowrie, a double to Boog Powell, an RBI single to Marcus Semien, and a sacrifice fly to Matt Joyce to allow the A’s to close the two-run deficit. In the next at-bat, he uncorked a wild pitch and then walked Khris Davis before being removed from the game. Miguel Castro relieved Britton, but walked Ryon Healy on four pitches to load the bases. Castro wriggled out of the jam by getting Matt Olson to pop up and striking out Matt Chapman, stranding two of Britton’s runners.

Britton entered Wednesday’s action 11-for-11 in save chances on the season with a 2.88 ERA and a 19/12 K/BB ratio in 25 innings. He missed two months earlier this season with a strained left forearm.

Noah Syndergaard’s bullpen session pushed back

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710 WOR’s Wayne Randazzo reports that Mets starter Noah Syndergaard‘s bullpen session has been pushed back a day or two. According to manager Terry Collins, it’s just a precaution. But, given the Mets’ history with injuries turning out to be much worse than expected, this is a bit concerning.

Syndergaard, 24, has been on the disabled list since the beginning of May with a partial tear of his right lat muscle. Prior to his April 30 start in which he suffered the lat injury, Syndergaard refused to undergo an MRI for his sore biceps.

In his five starts before the injury, Syndergaard gave up 14 runs (10 earned) on 28 hits and two walks with 32 strikeouts in 27 1/3 innings.