HBT reader scouts Casey Kelly and Kyle Gibson

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Casey Kelly.jpgI think the game was on NESN, so more people in New England could see this than usual, but HBT reader Moses Green — who performs a valuable and gratuitous service in editing each morning’s “And That Happened” — is vacationing in Maine and saw the Portland Sea Dogs and New Britain Rock Cats play in person yesterday afternoon.

The draw: Red Sox uber-prospect Casey Kelly took on Twins uber-prospect Kyle Gibson.  Kelly didn’t have a good game, giving up six runs on 10
hits in four innings and change. Beyond the line score, I found Moses’ scouting report rather interesting thanks to this comment:

The
verdict?  Kelly is a live-armed SS trying to learn to be a pitcher. Case in point, Kelly’s
pickoff moves and bluffs are comically horrible. Gibson looks really good, really polished.  He already looks
like a pro.

As Moses notes, this is why you have scouts. Most of us just never think of that kind of thing, content to sit back and yell for teams to call up the big prospects on a timetable to our liking based on their stat lines.

For example, I barked about the Giants saying that Buster Posey isn’t ready to catch in the big leagues and citing that as the reason for taking so long to call him up. But the only minor league action I ever see is whatever passes through Columbus Ohio, and Posey has never been here. I’m not paying attention to a whole host of other non-statistical considerations teams must make in determining whether a guy can play in the majors. Like, say, whether a guy can frame pitches. Or whether he has a decent move to first.

A small point, sure, but one about which I constantly have to remind myself when it comes to prospects.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: