And That Happened: Monday's Scores and Highlights

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Ubaldo Jimenez white cap.jpgRockies 4, Giants 0: The Cy Young Award is decided by something closer to tournament play than match play, but Ubaldo Jimenez’s decisive defeat of Tim Lincecum has him covered in either direction (CG, SHO 4 H, 9K). Linecum appears to have lost his telemetry (5.2 IP, 6 H, 4 R, 5 BB, 3K).

Braves 9, Phillies 3: I hit
this one up yesterday
. One thing I didn’t mention in that writeup
was how hilarious it was when Yunel Escobar popped up at second base and
asked for time out after his third inning RBI. It was hilarious because
he was thrown out trying to stretch his single into a double, so there
really wasn’t a need to call for time. You got thrown out, Escobar, take
all the time you want. Kind of like you did getting your kiester out of
the batter’s box. Not that I have a lot to complain about in this one.

Padres 18, Mets 6: Yesterday Jerry Manuel seemed stumped when asked in what situation he might use Oliver Perez. I think we found our answer: the last 2.2 innings of a monumental blowout against what is supposed to be one of baseball’s worst offenses.

Yankees 11, Indians 2: Andy Pettitte gave up one run over seven innings and A-Rod hit a grand slam and had six RBI.  The game stories play up the fact that Mark Teixeira was intentionally walked before the slam, but really it was a matter of Chris Perez trying to be careful with Teixeira, getting behind 3-0 and then Manny Acta deciding to just give him ball four instead of risking a pitch down main street.

Nationals 14, Astros 4: Ryan Zimmerman and Adam Dunn each collect four RBI and a guy listed in the box score as “C. Maldonado” who I know is Carlos Maldonado but whom, out of a fit of nostalgia, I’m going to pretend was Candy Maldonado, had three RBI of his own. Roy Oswalt was ejected for arguing balls and strikes after giving up four runs in two and a third innings. I’m going to assume that was an intentional passive-aggressive thing designed to make the Nats dubious about him so that he won’t have to reject them via his no-trade clause in the event they make the Astros an offer.

Pirates 2, Cubs 1: That’s six of seven for the Pirates over the Cubs this year. Would that they only played Chicago. Get this: Garrett Jones hit a homer to right field and a Cubs fan — a visiting Cubs fan, as this game was played in PNC Park — threw the ball back out onto the field.  I know that Pirates fans have had a lot of the fight taken out of them these past 17 years, but I hope against hope that a few of them came together to beat the living crap out of that punk. Um, figuratively speaking, that is. You know, with sharp bon mots and stuff.

Angels 7, Royals 1: Ervin Santana shuts down the Royals after which the Angels celebrate with subtle, affirming glances and modest smiles. Sadly Juan Rivera suffered a compound fracture of his jaw in the process and will be out for the remainder of the season.

Marlins 13, Brewers 5: After scoring three runs in three games against the Phillies the Feesh break out for 13 against Milwaukee — seven of which came in a single inning. The Brewers were actually up 4-0 in the sixth before the wheels fell off. Cameron Maybin hit an inside-the-park home run. As is usually the case, Maybin’s was the result of bad defensive play — in this case a bad route to the ball by Carlos Gomez — which is why I’m generally unimpressed by inside-the-park homers.

Athletics 4, Tigers 1: Two teams going in opposite directions: the A’s take three out of four from Detroit and the Tigers drop their fifth in six games. Time of rain delay before the game: 2:42; time of game: 2:48.

Dodgers 5, Diamondbacks 4: A walkoff balk from Esmerling Vasquez
completes the Dodgers’ comeback from a 4-0 deficit. Feel the excitement.

Cardinals 12, Reds 4: A totally different game after the rain delay than
it was before. Both Jaime Garcia and Bronson Arroyo came back when play
resumed, but only the former had any command. Ten walks in all for Reds
pitchers.

Blue Jays 3, Rays 2: Brandon Morrow pitches his best game of the season,
not allowing a hit until the sixth inning and giving up only one run on
three hits. The Rays have now lost six of their last eight games.

Twins 5, Mariners 4: Michael Cuddyer and Jason Kubel hit back-to-back jacks in the fourth to give the Twinkies a 5-1 lead and they basically held on from there.  Cuddyer got the start at second base, which is rather fun. He last did that in 2005.

Indians sign Brandon Guyer to a two-year extension

CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 02:  Brandon Guyer #6 of the Cleveland Indians celebrates Rajai Davis #20 two-run home run during the eighth inning to tie the game 6-6 against the Chicago Cubs in Game Seven of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on November 2, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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The Cleveland Indians and outfielder Brandon Guyer avoided arbitration by agreeing to a two-year, $5 million contract with a club option for 2019.

The Indians acquired Guyer from the Rays at last year’s trade deadline. After coming to Cleveland he posted a line of .333/.438/.469 in 38 games. He’s a .262/.349/.402 hitter over 344 games in five seasons in the bigs. He has led the league in being hit by pitches for the past two seasons, getting plunked 24 times in 2015 and 31 times in 2016. He went 6-for-18 with four walks and two HBPs in the playoffs for Cleveland. The man will work to get on base, my friends. And he can play all three outfield positions.

Nice signing.

Sarasota County to build the Braves a new spring training facility

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The Braves have trained at Walt Disney World for several years. The lease is up, however, and they’ve been on the hunt for a new facility for some time. Disney is just too geographically remote from most of the Grapefruit League facilities so they’ve looked on both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts for some time.

Their search appears to be over, however, as they have reached an agreement to move to Sarasota:

The Atlanta Braves formally plan to move the team’s spring training home to North Port in 2019, the team and Sarasota County announced Tuesday afternoon.

The announcement set the stage for final negotiations this spring on a contract to bring the Major League Baseball team to a new complex in the West Villages district just south of West Villages Parkway and U.S. 41, near the State College of Florida campus in North Port.

It’ll be a $75-$80 million complex on 70 acres. The story says it’s envisioned to anchor a “town center” commercial and residential district. If anyone has ever been to a spring training facility, however, one knows how ridiculous such an idea is. There is nothing more geographically un-centered and dispersed than a spring training facility. It’s a sea of open fields which private citizens generally cannot access and large parking lots. These facilities typically require major arteries, not quaint town streets, for reasonable access. The best any facilities do to integrate with surrounding communities can be seen in Fort Myers with the Twins and in Surprise, Arizona with the Rangers and Royals, where the facilities are part of larger community parks and recreation centers. That’s OK, and certainly better than nothing, but they’re not the anchors of the vibrant live/work/shop developments like the Braves and Sarasota are describing here.

But of course everyone involved has to say that, because selling such facilities as the engine of pie-in-the-sky development is a key part of making the large expenditure of public funds seem more palatable. And yes, there will be a big expenditure of public funds here: the Braves will be getting $56 million in taxpayer subsidies for the new place, some from the state, some from the county. The amount from the county, by the way, is calculated to fall just below the threshold required for a public vote on the expenditure. The Braves have always been blessed with the ability to avoid public votes for their corporate welfare, of course.

One wonders how many other wealthy private businesses owned by multinational corporations get tens of millions in tax dollars to build employee training centers. Not many, I’m sure. The Braves always seem to luck out in this regard, however.