Your Monday Afternoon Power Rankings

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At the outset, I’d like to say that there is absolutely no truth to the rumor that I had a graduate coaching assistant fill out my power rankings last week. I take my responsibilities in this regard just as seriously as Urban Meyer and Nick Saban take their votes in the USA Today coaches poll. I mean, if they can take a day out of their schedule to break down the top teams in the country and analyze their strengths and weaknesses in order to fulfill a task that gives them no extra pay and often works counter to their best interests of their program, surely I can find the time to do this post once a week, right?

Anyway, here are last week’s rankings.  On to this week’s:

1. Rays: Getting swept by the Red Sox was probably a good reminder that the Rays haven’t won jack yet. Indeed, based in part on the sweep, this is the first week I have to go with the Rays in the top spot by default more than anything else. I was tempted to put the Yankees here, but we’re still only a week removed from the Rays taking two from them in the Stadium so let’s give them one more week before demoting them. But they will be punished a bit: instead of the customary picture of Rays players high-fiving, all they get today is the team logo.

2. Yankees: Saturday’s nightmare game against Cleveland was rather alarming.  Given how the bullpen is going the loss of Alfredo Aceves might loom larger than many think.

3. Twins: They still can’t figure out the Yankees, but now they’re done with them. For the regular season anyway.

4. Reds: Taking seven of ten and knocking the cover off the ball is a pretty good way to go through life, son.

5. Padres: They’re still cruising. Now the biggest question is whether the team everyone figured would be the summer’s big seller has the stones to go out and actually buy a bat.

6. Cardinals: Albert Pujols would like you to know that his “slump” is over.  The quotes are because at its nadir, Pujols’ OPS was at .925.

7. Phillies: Whether this is a temporary demotion or the beginning of a freefall depends on whether they can figure out how to score runs again. One cold series is understandable. It happens. Two in row with no firepower is a concern.

8. Red Sox: A bit of leap — and maybe controversial to put them ahead of a Jays team whom they currently trail in the standings — but a sweep of the Rays gives you the benefit of the doubt when it comes to these things.

9. Braves: The last time they hosted the Phillies they began a nine-game losing streak. The next three days will tell us if they can actually justify some of the more ludicrous preseason predictions.

10. Blue Jays: Their next nine games come against the Rays and Yankees. I have this feeling that the Cinderella story is about to end.


11. Dodgers: Ethier comes back today and the next three come
against Arizona, so the week starts out about as good as one can hope.

12.
Athletics
: In the future, every team will be in first place in the
AL West for fifteen minutes. Well, maybe not the Mariners, but the other
three will be.

13. Giants: Now that Buster Posey has been
called up I can no longer complain that Brian Sabean won’t call up
Buster Posey. I feel like a cold warrior the day after the Berlin Wall
fell.

14. Rockies: While I’m on these two teams, its worth
noting that Ubaldo Jimenez faces Tim Lincecum at 4PM Eastern this
afternoon, in a matchup I’d like to refer to as the “Screw Up the Family
Cookout Invitational.”

15. Tigers: In honor of Max
Scherzer’s 14K post-callup performance, Dave Dombrowski sent the entire
roster down to Toledo last night and called them up at about 11 A.M.
this morning to be ready for today’s game against the Athletics. Either
that or else there was an epic party in Toledo last night.

16.
Rangers
: A pretty rough patch for the Rangers made all the rougher
by watching Derek Holland whip up 85 m.p.h. fastballs last night. And
Nelson Cruz on the DL doesn’t bode well for a suddenly flailing offense
either.

17. Mets: Yesterday Oliver Perez refused a request
to reassign him to the minors. Pretty soon they’re gonna start moving
his desk around, refuse to send him his paychecks and take his red
stapler from him.

18. Cubs: They’re creeping up and now
have a chance to get redemption against a Pirates team that has
inexplicably owned them this year.

19. Angels: I was
optimistic about their chances to get a head of steam behind them and do
what the Angels tend to do (i.e. win the AL West), but the Kendry
Morales injury may be too big to come back from.  Who hits the ball now?
Do they have the chits to get a Lance Berkman or even an Adam LaRoche?

20.
Marlins
: There’s no shame in getting dominated by Roy Halladay like
the Feesh did during the perfecto. There is shame, however, in only
scoring three runs against Kyle Kendrick, Jamie Moyer and friends in the other
two games of the series.

21. White Sox: Ozzie Guillen said
after yesterday’s game that the team is motivated to play better to
keep Kenny Williams from making trades and breaking up the team if they
definitively fall out of it. I’ve never heard a manager say anything
like that. But then again, I’ve not heard managers say a lot of the
things that Ozzie Guillen says.

22. Nationals: Sinking.
Will they be able to maintain the optimism that has surrounded the team
until Strasburg arrives, or will he be seen as a mere consolation prize
by the time he debuts?

23. Brewers: A nice bounceback
week. Forgive me, however, if I don’t take the tarp off the bandwagon
just yet.

24. Royals: The Royals have a team OBP of .338
and a SLG of .412.  The Rays have a team OBP of .335 and a SLG of .410.
Yet the Rays have scored 40 more runs in the same number of games. I
feel like Richard Dreyfuss in “Close Encounters,” sculpting stuff out of
my mashed potatoes, convinced that it means something important but not
knowing just what.

25. Pirates: Losers of three of four
to the Reds and three straight to the Braves. Guess they picked a bad
week to play good teams.

26. Mariners: They might have a
tough go of it without Mike Sweeney for a few days. Oh, you didn’t hear?
A
couple of anonymous Mets trashed a teammate to the press yesterday

so Sweeney hopped a flight back east to come and kick their ass.

27.
Diamondbacks
: Signs that summer is upon us: Memorial Day, higher
temperatures and the first Adam LaRoche trade rumors of the season. 
There are a lot of players worse than Adam LaRoche, but I don’t know of
any who are more inessential than he is, if that makes any sense.

28.
Indians
: In case you haven’t noticed, and judging by the attendance
you haven’t,
the Indians have continued to stink.

29. Astros: This has
nothing to do with the current Astros team, but I find myself strangely
affected by the Astros Daily’s
page of all of the former Astros and Colt .45s who have died
. One of
many random observations I had: I was aware that Eddie Matthews played
for the Astros, but I had never seen a picture of him in their uniform
before now. It’s jarring to see a guy who played for the Boston Braves
in an Astros cap.  Pretty jarring to see Nellie Fox in one too. I guess baseball went from a sepia toned golden age to whatever it is now at the exact moment the Astros came into existence. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

30. Orioles: Losers of five in a row
and now they have nine straight against the Yankees and Red Sox ahead
of them. Y’all best settle in and get comfy, Orioles, because you’re
gonna be in 30-ville for a good long while.

Mike Matheny tried to have his own son picked off at first base

PHOENIX, AZ - AUGUST 26: Manager Mike Matheny #26 of the St Louis Cardinals looks on from the dugout during the first inning of a MLB game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field on August 26, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Cardinals defeated the Diamondbacks 3-1. (Photo by Ralph Freso/Getty Images)
Ralph Freso/Getty Images
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Cardinals manager Mike Matheny has a son, Tate, who was selected by the Red Sox in the fourth round of the 2015 draft out of Missouri State University. Tate, an outfielder, spent the 2015 season with Low-A Lowell and last year played at Single-A Greenville.

Now in spring camp with the Red Sox, Tate is trying to continue his ascent through the minor league system. On Monday afternoon in a game against his father’s Cardinals, Tate pinch-ran after Xander Bogaerts singled to center field to lead off the bottom of the fifth inning. Mike wasn’t about to let his son catch any breaks. Via Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

That’s right: Mike tried to have his own son picked off at first base. That’s just cold, man.

Tate was erased shortly thereafter when Mookie Betts grounded into a 6-4-3 double play. Tate got his first at-bat in the seventh and struck out.

Do we really need metal detectors at spring training facilities?

sloan-metal-detector-1
Craig Calcaterra
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MESA, AZ — Over the past couple of seasons we’ve, more or less, gotten used to the sight of metal detectors at major league ballparks. And the sight of long lines outside of them, requiring us to get to the park a bit earlier or else risk missing some of the early inning action.

Like so much else over the past fifteen and a half years, we’re given assurances by people in charge that it’s for “security,” and we alter our lives and habits accordingly. This despite the fact that security experts have argued that it’s a mostly useless and empty exercise in security theater. More broadly, they’ve correctly noted that it’s a cynical and defeatist solution in search of a problem. But hey, welcome to 21st Century America.

And welcome metal detectors to spring training:

scottsdale-metal-detector

Beginning this year, Major League Baseball is mandating that all spring training facilities use some form of metal detection, be it walkthrough detectors like the ones shown here at the Giants’ park in Scottsdale or wands like the one being used on the nice old lady above at the Cubs facility in Mesa.

I asked Major League Baseball why they are requiring them in Florida and Arizona. They said that the program was not implemented in response to any specific incident or threat at a baseball game, but are “precautionary measures.” They say that metal detection “has not posed significant inconvenience or taken away from the ballpark experience” since being required at big league parks in 2015 and believe it will work the same way at the spring training parks.They caution fans, however, that, as the program gets underway, they should allow for more time for entry.

And that certainly makes sense:

sloan-metal-detector-2

I took this photo a few minutes after the home plate gate opened at Sloan Park yesterday afternoon. As I noted this morning, the Cubs sell out every game in their 15,000-seat park. That’s a lot of wanding and, as a result, it could lead to a lot of waiting.

But the crowds here all seemed to get through the line pretty quickly. Perhaps because the wanding is not exactly a time-consuming affair:

Not every security guard was as, well, efficient as this guy. But hardly anyone walking through the gate was given a particularly thorough go-over. I saw several hundred people go through the procedure soon after the gates opened and most of them weren’t scanned bellow the level of their hip pockets. I went back a little closer to game time when most people were already in the park and the lines were shorter. The procedure was a bit more deliberate then, though not dramatically so. This is all new for the security people too — spring training just started — and it’s fair to say that they are trying hard to balance the needs of their new precautionary measures against the need to keep the lines moving and the fans happy.

On this day at least it seemed that fan happiness was winning. I spoke with several fans after they got through the gates and none of them offered much in the way of complaint about being wanded. The clear consensus: it’s just what we do now. We have metal detectors and cameras at schools and places of work and security procedures have been ratcheted up dramatically across the board. That we now have them at ballparks is not surprising to anyone, really. It’s just not a thing anyone thinks to question.

And so they don’t.