Is Jacoby Ellsbury being a wuss?

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ellsbury high-five.JPGTony Massarotti reports on the little dustup the Red Sox are having with Jacoby Ellsbury over his injury.  Short version: Ellsbury is still out of the lineup and says he’s hurting.  The Sox are downplaying it and wondering just how hurt Ellsbury really is.  Massarotti is siding with the team and is questioning Ellsbury’s desire to play:

Has Jacoby now become to the Sox what (medical) Bill Cartwright once was
to the New York Knicks? Is it Ellsbury – or DLsbury? . . . In the minds of the Sox – and others – Ellsbury has a reputation,
something only he can be responsible for. Earlier this month, Mike
Lowell openly wondered whether he still had a role on the Red Sox, but
at least Lowell’s remarks were motivated by the desire to play,
something that hardly makes him different from the majority of athletes. In Ellsbury’s case, the problem seems to be the opposite.
Does he want to play or doesn’t he?

I can’t say that partake in enough Red Sox Kremlinology to know whether or not Ellsbury is malingering or has questionable intestinal fortitude or what.  This smells to me, however, like something of an unfair broadside, if for no other reason than Massarotti cites the imagined pleas of “the pink hats in Camp Jacoby” and everyone’s favorite villain, Scott Boras in furtherance of his argument.

I don’t know if Ellsbury truly is well enough to play or not, but I don’t see how anything Massarotti cites in his article helps us figure that out.  This is one of those situations where an anonymous source who actually knows what’s going on medically-speaking could be useful.  Short of that, Massarotti is just knocking Ellsbury’s character, isn’t he?

Josh Donaldson is still seeking a long-term deal with the Blue Jays

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If it were up to him, Blue Jays third baseman Josh Donaldson would finish the remainder of his career in Toronto. In fact, he’d be “ticked pink” if the club decided to sign him to a long-term deal. Whether the Blue Jays share that sentiment is still unclear, as Donaldson said Saturday that the team has yet to engage his agent in extension talks.

“I’ve said that I wanted to be here,” he told MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm. “That’s pretty much all I can say. I’m not the one who makes the decisions, nor would I try to put them in the position to do that. Like I said, I believe the situation will become more fluid when the time is right.”

That doesn’t necessarily mean an extension is out of the question. The Blue Jays reached an unprecedented one-year, $23 million agreement with the three-time All-Star in arbitration, and have been reticent to field trade offers despite continued interest from the Cardinals this winter.

Donaldson, 32, is poised to enter his eighth season in the majors and fourth with the Blue Jays. In 2017, he batted .270/.385/.559 with 33 home runs and a .944 OPS in 496 plate appearances, ranking sixth among all major league third baseman with 5.0 fWAR. He’s scheduled to enter free agency following the 2018 season.