So the Mets are fighting with one another

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Francisco Rodriguez headshot.jpgWe saw the the Jerry Manuel-John Maine argument last week and that was fun, but a dustup on Sunday between closer Francisco Rodriguez and bullpen coach Randy Niemann had escaped our notice.

The way I read it on Sunday night — and this came straight from K-Rod in the game stories that were written — was that guys in the bullpen were just roughhousing and having fun (“We were just fooling around . . .we were just kidding with each
other” he said).  I and most everyone else figured no biggie and didn’t mention it.  That’s not really what happened, however:

But two people in the Mets organization confirmed that the confrontation
between Rodriguez and Niemann was indeed a heated one and might have
escalated if other pitchers had not intervened.

The source of the dispute, the New York Times reports, is K-Rod’s overuse. It seems he doesn’t like the fact that Jerry Manuel has him warm up multiple times a game, getting five-out saves, and the like.

My first impulse is to tell Rodriguez to cry me a river. He’s paid a metric butt-ton of money, and if any reliever in baseball should be expected to go the extra mile, it’s him.

My second impulse, however, is to think that Jerry Manuel has probably never had that conversation with him, the constant warmups are thus rather disorienting to K-Rod and he’s not completely sure what’s being asked of him. One way to solve this: have Manuel tell K-Rod that he’s expected to be a Gossage-style relief ace.  I bet if it was couched in those terms he’d dig it.

Of course, all that assumes that that’s what Manuel is doing here rather than simply panicking and calling for his closer to warm up eleventeen times a game.  Which may not be the safest assumption on the planet.

Either way, the Mets should probably remember that everyone loves a winning team that fights among themselves (e.g. the 1970s A’s and Yankees).  No one likes a last place team that does it.

Bryce Harper sets April record for runs scored

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With four runs scored during Sunday’s 23-5 drubbing of the Mets, Nationals outfielder Bryce Harper set a new April record for runs scored at 32, MLB.com’s Oliver Macklin reports. The record was previously held by Larry Walker, who scored 29 runs for the Rockies in April 1997.

Harper finished 2-for-4 with a pair of walks and a solo home run (off of Mets catcher Kevin Plawecki) on the afternoon. He’s now hitting .391/.509/.772 with nine home runs and 26 RBI on the year.

Anthony Rendon racks up six hits, including three homers, and knocks in 10 runs vs. Mets

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Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon became the first player in nearly a decade to knock in 10 runs in one game, doing so on Sunday afternoon at home against the Mets. Rendon went 6-for-6 with three home runs along with the 10 RBI. It’s Rendon’s first time achieving any of the three feats — six hits, three homers, 10 RBI — individually in a game.

The Nationals trounced the Mets 23-5. In total, they hit seven homers. Along with Rendon’s three, Matt Wieters hit two while Bryce Harper and Adam Lind hit one each. Wieters had four RBI; Ryan Zimmerman, Michael Taylor, and Lind knocked in two each. The Nationals have now scored double-digit runs in four out of their last six games.

Angels outfielder Garret Anderson was the last player to drive in 10 runs in one game, achieving the feat on August 21, 2007 against the Yankees. Rendon is the 13th player since 1913 to drive in 10 runs in a single game and only the third to do it this millennium.

There were four six-hit games from individual players last season, eclipsing the aggregate total of three from 2010-15. The last player to have six hits, including three home runs, in one game was the Dodgers’ Shawn Green on May 23, 2002 against the Brewers. The only player to have six hits, including three homers, and 10 RBI in a game was Walker Cooper of the 1949 Reds.

The last team to score at least 23 runs in a game was the Rangers on August 22, 2007 against the Orioles when they won 30-3. Sunday’s contest was the seventh time this millennium a team has scored at least 23 runs and the 47th dating back to 1913. The only other time Mets pitching had allowed 23 runs in a game was on June 11, 1985 against the Phillies.

Things keep going wrong for the Mets. Noah Syndergaard started Sunday’s game after refusing an MRI for his sore biceps. He lasted only 1 1/3 innings, giving up five runs, before being pulled with a lat strain. The last-place Mets are now 10-14.