Your American League All-Star vote leaders

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2010 All-Star Game.JPGIt’s early yet, but if the All-Star voting ended today, the nine starting position players in the AL
would be
:

C: Joe Mauer
1B: Mark Teixeira
2B: Robinson Cano
SS: Derek Jeter
3B: Evan
Longoria
OF: Ichiro Suzuki, Carl Crawford, Nelson Cruz
DH: Vladimir
Guerrero.

There have been worse voting results in history, but this one is far from perfect. Mauer, Longoria and Guerrero are obvious choices at their position thus far. Otherwise:

  • Teixeira is an awful choice — Justin Morneau is destroying baseballs this year.
  • Cano is probably the best choice at second, but Ty Wigginton is pretty close.
  • No one is having a fabulous season at short in the AL, but Jeter isn’t having the best either. I’d go with Elvis Andrus I suppose, or maybe Alex Gonzalez, depending on how you feel about contact vs. power vs. glove dynamics;
  • In the outfield the Nelson Cruz choice is a good one even with his limited playing time. I understand the Crawford and Suzuki picks, but [gulp] Vernon Wells and Alexis Rios are having great seasons so far, as are Shin-Soo Choo, Magglio Ordonez, and Nick Swisher.
  • DH is the right choice, but check out the vote getters directly behind Vlad: Matsui, Griffey, Pat Burrell and Big Papi.  Is this a reflection on the state of the DH in baseball, or a harsh comment on the state of fandom?  You be the judge.

And for the record, I’ll be updating this kind of thing throughout the early summer — NL vote leaders tomorrow — and when I do I’ll likely be critical of the vote totals. However, I realize that this is a fan’s vote and that the All-Star Game is a fan’s game.

It’s my personal preference that those who are playing best in the first half get honored, but I know that I don’t have a monopoly on wisdom when it comes to this subject. And ultimately? The All-Star Game has become something of a blah event anyway, so who cares?  More on that as the summer wears on as well.

Drew Pomeranz: “I definitely feel like I can maybe help (as a reliever in the playoffs).”

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 5:  Drew Pomeranz #31 of the Boston Red Sox pitches during the second inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres at PETCO Park on September 5, 2016 in San Diego, California.  (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
Denis Poroy/Getty Images
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Red Sox starter Drew Pomeranz hasn’t pitched in a week due to soreness in his left forearm. He threw a bullpen on Thursday afternoon and said, “I definitely feel like I can maybe help (as a reliever in the playoffs,” as ESPN’s Scott Lauber reports.

The Red Sox clinched the AL East on Wednesday, so they don’t need to rush Pomeranz along. And using him out of the bullpen might ultimately be best as he regressed quite a bit after coming to Boston from San Diego in July. In 13 starts with the Red Sox, Pomeranz has a 4.68 ERA with a 69/24 K/BB ratio in 67 1/3 innings.

Eduardo Rodriguez and Clay Buchholz have been throwing the ball quite well as of late. Paired with Rick Porcello and David Price, the Red Sox still have the depth to be menacing in the postseason.

Jesus Montero suspended 50 games for use of a stimulant

Seattle Mariners' Jesus Montero follows through on an RBI-double in the first inning of a spring training baseball game against the Kansas City Royals, Saturday, March 19, 2016, in Surprise, Ariz. (John Sleezer/The Kansas City Star via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
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Remember Jesus Montero? The former Yankees and Mariners prospect? Well, he was picked up by the Blue Jays back in March after the Mariners waived him and played 126 games for Triple-A Buffalo this year. That went alright, I suppose, with Montero hitting .317/.349/.438 with 11 homers. He played a bit of first base too, trying to break the mold he’s been stuck in as a 26-year-old DH.

If this season was a platform for him to make one last push to the bigs, the platform was just pulled out from under him: he has been suspended for 50 games after testing positive for dimethylbutylamine (DMBA), a stimulant in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.

The minor league season is over, of course, so he’ll serve that suspension next season. Assuming the Jays keep him in the fold.