Dayton Moore: "The Process" is 8-10 years

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Thumbnail image for dayton moore.jpgDayton Moore has taken a lot of guff from Royals fans in the past couple of years as a result of his constant exhortations for them to “trust The Process,” which is the term he uses to refer to his plan to rebuild the Royals.  The problems with this? “The Process” is rather amorphus, inasmuch as one year it appears that the team is going with youth and the next year they sign a bunch of mediocre free agents.  No one really knows what “The Process” is.

But the worst part is no one really knows how long “The Process” is supposed to take.  That is, they didn’t until today, when Dayton Moore coughed up a deadline:

“Our goal by 2013, 2014 is to have the majority of our 25-man roster be
homegrown players. That’s what we’re shooting for, that’s
been the long-term plan all along . . . Look what Colorado did, look what Minnesota did, look what the New York
Yankees did. It took the Yankees seven years. They
committed to it in ’89, and finally in ’96 they won with homegrown guys.
I’m not talking about getting to .500, I’m talking about winning the
World Series when I say eight to 10 years.”

Well, I think he’s backdating the Yankees’ rebuilding a bit, as things there really didn’t get going until Gene Michael was hired in 1991 and began to rebuild the team’s player development model and change the team from a free-agent pariah to a free-agent player.  If I had to put a date on that I’d say maybe 1992, when Danny Tartabull was signed and Derek Jeter was drafted.

But fine, let’s give Moore his eight or ten years.  Royals fans have been waiting this long. What’s several more?

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.