Dayton Moore: "The Process" is 8-10 years


Thumbnail image for dayton moore.jpgDayton Moore has taken a lot of guff from Royals fans in the past couple of years as a result of his constant exhortations for them to “trust The Process,” which is the term he uses to refer to his plan to rebuild the Royals.  The problems with this? “The Process” is rather amorphus, inasmuch as one year it appears that the team is going with youth and the next year they sign a bunch of mediocre free agents.  No one really knows what “The Process” is.

But the worst part is no one really knows how long “The Process” is supposed to take.  That is, they didn’t until today, when Dayton Moore coughed up a deadline:

“Our goal by 2013, 2014 is to have the majority of our 25-man roster be
homegrown players. That’s what we’re shooting for, that’s
been the long-term plan all along . . . Look what Colorado did, look what Minnesota did, look what the New York
Yankees did. It took the Yankees seven years. They
committed to it in ’89, and finally in ’96 they won with homegrown guys.
I’m not talking about getting to .500, I’m talking about winning the
World Series when I say eight to 10 years.”

Well, I think he’s backdating the Yankees’ rebuilding a bit, as things there really didn’t get going until Gene Michael was hired in 1991 and began to rebuild the team’s player development model and change the team from a free-agent pariah to a free-agent player.  If I had to put a date on that I’d say maybe 1992, when Danny Tartabull was signed and Derek Jeter was drafted.

But fine, let’s give Moore his eight or ten years.  Royals fans have been waiting this long. What’s several more?

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.