Frank McCourt has a "slush fund," secret partners and pays his kids to do nothing

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John Weinbach of FanHouse reports some more unseemliness from the land of Frank McCourt and the Dodgers:

Over the past 18 months, the Los Angeles Dodgers paid nearly $4 million
in “consulting services” to [the John McCourt Company], an entity that
has done virtually nothing for the club, even as the team has made a
concerted effort to raise ticket prices, trim payroll and acquire
players on the cheap. Moreover, the club paid two of Frank and Jamie
McCourt’s adult sons large salaries — $400,000 and $200,000 per year,
respectively — for services that are undefined and could not be
described by either Frank or Jamie McCourt, according to court documents
filed in the couple’s divorce case.

Jamie McCourt’s attorneys call the John McCourt company a “slush fund” which Frank uses to hide money.  My guess is that she’s less critical of the big salaries her kids make for apparently do-nothing jobs.

In addition, there are apparently two limited partners in the Dodgers — guys no one ever knew about, but who provided considerable funds to the McCourts to buy the team — whose debt gets converted into “sizable equity” in the team if the McCourts default on the loans.

On the one hand this is shocking — and Josh Fisher does his excellent-as-usual job breaking down all of the implications, complete with an apt comparison to the Texas Rangers, who are poster children for what happens when good teams go into bad debts like the McCourts seem to have done.

On the other hand, I would not be at all shocked if multiple teams in Major League Baseball operated in just the same way, complete with family jobs, slush funds, silent partners and all manner of vehicles which, either intentionally or by happy accident, work to conceal the amount of cash a baseball team really earns and where its money is spent.  Baseball teams are almost all purely private companies, most of which are family owned. Despite their antitrust exemption and all of the tax money they consume in the form of public stadiums and the like, we know just as much about their operations as we do the corner gyro shop, and that’s just the way they like it.

The only difference here: we have a divorce case in which these machinations are laid bare.  And however distressing it is for Dodgers fans to see where all the money that should be going towards starting pitching is going, these revelations are educational and useful.

Zach Britton’s consecutive saves streak has ended at 60

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On September 20, 2015, Zach Britton blew a save against the Rays. Little did he know that he wouldn’t blow another save until August 23, 2017, converting 60 consecutive save opportunities.

Britton took the mound with a 7-5 lead in the top of the ninth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Athletics. He yielded a single to Jed Lowrie, a double to Boog Powell, an RBI single to Marcus Semien, and a sacrifice fly to Matt Joyce to allow the A’s to close the two-run deficit. In the next at-bat, he uncorked a wild pitch and then walked Khris Davis before being removed from the game. Miguel Castro relieved Britton, but walked Ryon Healy on four pitches to load the bases. Castro wriggled out of the jam by getting Matt Olson to pop up and striking out Matt Chapman, stranding two of Britton’s runners.

Britton entered Wednesday’s action 11-for-11 in save chances on the season with a 2.88 ERA and a 19/12 K/BB ratio in 25 innings. He missed two months earlier this season with a strained left forearm.

Noah Syndergaard’s bullpen session pushed back

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710 WOR’s Wayne Randazzo reports that Mets starter Noah Syndergaard‘s bullpen session has been pushed back a day or two. According to manager Terry Collins, it’s just a precaution. But, given the Mets’ history with injuries turning out to be much worse than expected, this is a bit concerning.

Syndergaard, 24, has been on the disabled list since the beginning of May with a partial tear of his right lat muscle. Prior to his April 30 start in which he suffered the lat injury, Syndergaard refused to undergo an MRI for his sore biceps.

In his five starts before the injury, Syndergaard gave up 14 runs (10 earned) on 28 hits and two walks with 32 strikeouts in 27 1/3 innings.