The Wilpons may save some money

1 Comment

No, not by cutting Jeff Francoeur into pieces and selling him for scrap, but by virtue of a law winding its way through Congress that could allow them to hold on to $48 million that, under current law, they might have had to forfeit as a result of their connection to the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme.

The law — the details of which are are much better spelled-out in Dan Freed’s column at TheStreet.com — would prevent trustees cleaning up after Madoff-like scams from from collecting earlier investors’ “gains” and redistributing them to later, less lucky investors.  Such a move is called a clawback, and this proposed law would limit the maneuver. The Wilpons actually came out of the Madoff scam with a bit more money in their account than they
started with — $48 million, actually. Under present law, they’d be subject to clawbacks. If the law passes, the Wilpons will likely be in the clear.

Which isn’t necessarily an injustice or anything. On a very basic level, the Wilpons were victims just like the other investors. That they happened to be in earlier than others and thus got the benefit of Madoff’s phony investment gains as opposed to getting the shaft is not their fault. And besides, just because they got more money back than they put in doesn’t mean that they weren’t losers too. Indeed, they thought they were doing way better than their $48 million gain they got and likely structured their lives and businesses accordingly.  Because of this sort of thing clawbacks are controversial and problematic.  I can’t really speak to the merits of this particular law (I’m a bit out of my depth here), but the beliefs that clawbacks often work to unwittingly unjust ends is pretty widely held.

But I do know this much: as things currently stand, the Wilpons, if they have a bit of business sense, have $48 million mentally socked away to be given up in clawbacks later. If the law passes, however, it will be theirs to spend once again.

Maybe — just maybe — they’ll spend it on the Mets. 

Cubs sign Drew Smyly to a two-year, $10 million contract

Stacy Revere/Getty Images
1 Comment

The Cubs announced on Tuesday evening that the club signed pitcher Drew Smyly to a two-year contract. Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports the contract is for $10 million total and allows Smyly to earn another $7 million with performance bonuses. Smyly was non-tendered by the Mariners at the beginning of the month and became a free agent.

Smyly, 28, underwent season-ending Tommy John surgery in late June. He’s expected to miss, at minimum, the first half of the 2018 season. The Cubs are hoping he can contribute to a playoff push in the latter half of the season as well as in 2019.

Smyly didn’t pitch at all in 2017. When he was healthy the season prior, he made 30 starts for the Rays and put up a 4.88 ERA and a 167/49 K/BB ratio in 175 1/3 innings.