The Mariners continue their childish boycott of Larry LaRue

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Mariners logo.gifFrom today’s Tacoma News-Tribune Mariners-Orioles game story by Larry LaRue:

For the second day, none of the players would talk to The News Tribune
in the wake of a players-only meeting that followed a report that Ken
Griffey Jr. was napping in the clubhouse during a game last week.

Are there any grownups working for the Seattle Mariners, or do Mike Sweeney and Ken Griffey, Jr. run everything now?

I mean, fine, be as mad as you want about LaRue’s reporting, but the spectacle of 25 ballplayers shunning someone who’s job it is to cover the team is a pathetic one, especially in light of the fact that the team’s denials of his reporting were tepid and equivocal.  Unless the Mariners are seriously accusing LaRue of making his story up out of whole cloth, two of those 25 people shunning him LaRue told him what he reported. If the Mariners have a problem with the substance of it, they should be looking within, not lashing out a beat guy from Tacoma. 

Either Don Wakamatsu or Jack Zduriencik needs to tell the Mariners players to get over it and be the bigger men.  Larry LaRue isn’t the first reporter to write something negative about this team, and he most certainly won’t be the last, especially given how poorly they’re playing.  If the team can’t handle that, how on Earth can they be expected to handle the A’s, Rangers and Angels?

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.