Jarrod Saltalamacchia is having trouble throwing the ball back to the pitcher

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Jarrod Saltalamacchia has had all kinds of problems stemming from Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, which is a condition that causes arm and hand numbness. He underwent surgery to correct the problem, which involved the removal of a rib, and the Rangers demoted him to the minors after he struggled to come back.
Saltalamacchia has hit exceptionally well at Triple-A, batting .343 with a .952 OPS in 18 games, but his throwing issues have snowballed to the point that he’s now having trouble simply getting the ball back to the pitcher. Here’s more from Bob Hersom of MiLB.com:

In Salty’s last game, Tuesday night at AT&T Bricktown Ballpark, 12 of his throws back to the pitcher landed either short of the mound or in center field. He had five errant throws in the first inning alone.



“He’s just got to keep playing until he gets it right,” RedHawks manager Bobby Jones said. “I don’t know what else to do. It’s a shame. It’s definitely what’s keeping him here. He’s blocking the ball well and swinging the bat well. He’s just got to figure it out. It’s a shame.”

Saltalamacchia has repeatedly said that the latest throwing problems are unrelated to his initial injury and his throws to second base on steal attempts have apparently been just fine, which seems to indicate that this is a mental issue rather than a physical one. Whatever the case hopefully he can get past it, because the one-time top prospect has already had enough roadblocks laid in front of him.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.