This June's Philles-Jays series to be moved to Philadelphia

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The home team.jpgThere have been rumblings about this since February, but there will be an announcement later today in which the Jays-Phillies series currently scheduled for June 25-27th in Toronto will be moved to Citizens Bank Park in Philly due to interference from the G-20 summit, which is also scheduled in Toronto for that time.

The technical effect: the Phillies will be the visiting team in their own home park, and the designated hitter will be used.

The practical effect: The Phillies get three extra home games this year and Toronto fans don’t get to see the return of Roy Halladay, which many people had been looking forward to.

This, as the poets like to say, sucks.  Still, it will only “totally suck” if either the Jays or someone in the NL East besides the Phillies finishes one game out of a playoff spot.  Otherwise, everyone will survive, I presume.

One question I presume many will be asking is why Philly? Why not put it in a neutral location, or try to make some event out of it by, say, putting it in Puerto Rico or in the Grand Canyon or something?

My response to that is that baseball (a) wants to maximize revenue, and that while some promotion might be fun, it’s not money-in-the-bank like 40,000+ people buying beer in Philly is; and (b) those neutral site games baseball put in Milwaukee a few years ago due to early-season snowouts and hurricanes and stuff were criticized for being antiseptic and rather joyless games, devoid of any real roaring crowd.

I’d still prefer the powers that be to try and find some way to keep the game in Toronto, but seeing as though that’s apparently impossible, Philly is the best that can be done. I mean, at least in Philly one side is getting cheered, and that kind of matters.

Athletics sign Santiago Casilla to two-year, $11 million deal

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 10: Santiago Casilla #46 of the San Francisco Giants throws a pitch during the 9th inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on August 10, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
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After letting rumors of the deal percolate for the last week, the Athletics officially announced their two-year, $11 million contract with right-hander Santiago Casilla on Friday (and threw a little bit of shade at the Giants, too). As previously reported, the contract includes an extra $3 million in performance bonuses.

Casilla, 36, got his major league start with Oakland back in 2004, racking up a 5.11 ERA and four saves over six seasons in the A’s bullpen. After picking up a minor league deal with the Giants in 2010, the righty flitted in and out of the closing role with varying degrees of success. Notwithstanding a slight downturn in his production rate during the 2016 season, he earned 123 saves and a 2.42 ERA during the past seven years in San Francisco. Securing another closing role might be a little tougher across the Bay, however, with a bullpen that includes fellow closers Ryan Madson, Ryan Dull and Sean Doolittle.

Keith Law: The Braves have the best farm system. Who has the worst?

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 06:  General manager Dave Stewart of the Arizona Diamondbacks laughs on the field before the Opening Day MLB game against the San Francisco Giants at Chase Field on April 6, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Why is this man smiling? Man, I wouldn’t be smiling if I read what I just read.

This is the week when ESPN’s Keith Law releases his prospect and farm system rankings. He kicks off his content this week with a top-to-bottom ranking of all 30 farm systems. As a rule he limits his analysis to players who are currently in the minors and who have not yet exhausted their rookie of the year eligibility.

For the second straight year, Law ranks the Braves as the best system in baseball. Number two — making a big leap from last year’s number 13 ranking – is the New York Yankees. Dead last: the Arizona Diamondbacks, which Law says “Dave Stewart ritually disemboweled” over the past two years. That’s gotta hurt.

If you want to know the reasons and the rankings of everyone in between you’ll have to get an ESPN Insider subscription. Sorry, I know everyone hates to pay for content on the Internet, but Keith and others who do this kind of work put a lot of damn work into it and this is what pays their bills. I typically don’t like to pay for content myself, but I do pay for an ESPN Insider subscription. It’s worth it for Law’s work alone.