Castro commits three errors in Wrigley debut


Starlin Castro slips.jpgNo one really notices this sort of thing if Starlin Castro didn’t hit 6 RBI in his big-splash major league debut last Friday, but he did, so people notice. It was a bad night for Castro against the Marlins, as he committed three errors at short. A video reel of all three can be seen here.

For those who can’t watch the video, the first one came in the third inning when he fielded a grounder and appeared to throw it before he came set, sending the ball up the first base line.  Castro appeared to come set on the second error — this one in the sixth inning — but his throw just sailed on him, allowing the runner to reach.

The third error — though it did not lead to a Marlins run — was perhaps the most problematic.  It came with Hanley Ramirez up to bat in the eighth. Castro failed to come up with the ball on a backhand play. Fair enough, that happens. What doesn’t always happen was his reaction: he jogged after the ball, which sat several yards behind him in the grass. He wasn’t in any particular hurry, and he wasn’t paying any attention to Hanley Ramirez, which allowed Ramirez to take second base.

Nerves? Youth? Brain locks? Probably all of the above. But in light of his reputation and his monster debut last week, people in Chicago are going to expect more out of him than your typical rookie shortstop, so nights like this are going to be highlighted.

Clayton Kershaw does not need back surgery

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 16:  Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers stands on the pitcher's mound in the sixth inning against the Chicago Cubs during game two of the National League Championship Series at Wrigley Field on October 16, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman says thatClayton Kershaw is unlikely to need back surgery for the herniated disk that sidelined him for more than two months during the season.

Friedman says that Kershaw feels good and that he doesn’t anticipate surgery. It was unclear if that would be the case because, even as Kershaw came back in September and pitched deep into the playoffs, often on short rest, everyone was fairly tight-lipped about how Kershaw was feeling.

For what it’s worth, Kershaw looked sound mechanically, even if was up and down at times in October.

People are paying tens of thousands to get into the World Series

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 24:  Chicago Cubs fans visit Wrigley Field on October 24, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs will face off against the Cleveland Indians in the World Series beginning tomorrow. This will be the Cubs first trip to the series since 1945. The Indians last trip to the series was 1948.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Ticket prices for the World Series are always ridiculous, but this year things are heading to a whole new ridiculous level.

Now, to be clear, some of the figures you hear are not what will be paid for tickets. The Associated Press has the de rigueur story of ticket holders asking, like, a million dollars for their tickets and ticket seekers willing to give all kinds of in-kind goods and services for a chance to see the Cubs play in Wrigley. A lot of that noise will never amount to any real transaction and, in some cases, will likely end up with someone getting arrested. It’s crazy time, you know.

But even if those million dollar and sex-for-tickets stories end up being more smoke than fire, people will end up paying astronomical prices to get in. Some already are. ESPN’s Darren Rovell reports that someone paid $32,000 on StubHub for 4 seats in the front row by the Cubs visitors dugout for Game 2 at Progressive Field in Cleveland. The prices in Wrigley Field for Games 3, 4 and, if necessary, 5 will likely go higher. There’s a ton of pent-up demand on the part of both Cubs and Indians fans, after all.

Still: trying to imagine how an in-stadium experience, no matter how long someone has been waiting for it, is worth that kind of scratch. Guess it all depends on whether that kind of money constitutes that kind of scratch for a given person.