Castro commits three errors in Wrigley debut

3 Comments

Starlin Castro slips.jpgNo one really notices this sort of thing if Starlin Castro didn’t hit 6 RBI in his big-splash major league debut last Friday, but he did, so people notice. It was a bad night for Castro against the Marlins, as he committed three errors at short. A video reel of all three can be seen here.

For those who can’t watch the video, the first one came in the third inning when he fielded a grounder and appeared to throw it before he came set, sending the ball up the first base line.  Castro appeared to come set on the second error — this one in the sixth inning — but his throw just sailed on him, allowing the runner to reach.

The third error — though it did not lead to a Marlins run — was perhaps the most problematic.  It came with Hanley Ramirez up to bat in the eighth. Castro failed to come up with the ball on a backhand play. Fair enough, that happens. What doesn’t always happen was his reaction: he jogged after the ball, which sat several yards behind him in the grass. He wasn’t in any particular hurry, and he wasn’t paying any attention to Hanley Ramirez, which allowed Ramirez to take second base.

Nerves? Youth? Brain locks? Probably all of the above. But in light of his reputation and his monster debut last week, people in Chicago are going to expect more out of him than your typical rookie shortstop, so nights like this are going to be highlighted.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

Getty Images
5 Comments

The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
1 Comment

If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.