Jamie Moyer becomes oldest pitcher to throw a shutout

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Thumbnail image for moyer small.jpgFriday night provided quite an interesting contrast. On one hand, we had the excitement of 20-year-old Starlin Castro — the first major league player born in the 90s — making history in his major league debut. At the other end of the spectrum, 47-year-old Jamie Moyer became the oldest pitcher in major league history to throw a shutout, holding the Braves to just two hits as part of a 7-0 victory.

The previous oldest pitcher to throw a complete-game shutout was Phil Niekro, when he did it for the Yankees at the age of 46 in 1986. The last non-knuckleballer to do it? Satchel Paige.

When told of his accomplishment, the soft-tossing Moyer was pretty even-keeled about the whole thing (via Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer). 

“Cool,” he said. “Just doing my job.”

Some job. Here’s a guy who continues to defy logic, surviving in a game increasingly built on youth.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”