The differences between Mets fans and Yankees fans

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Mets Yankees logos.jpgThe Wall Street Journal hired a public opinion polling firm to conduct a survey of New Yorkers in an effort to figure out the differences between Mets fans and Yankees fans. Among the results:

  • Sixty percent of the survey’s baseball fans were Yankees fans, 33% were Mets fans. They break down how you’d expect geographically, with more Yankees fans in the Bronx and more Mets fans in Queens, but Manhattan is split down the middle at 19% each. Which means that 62% of baseball fans in Manhattan don’t root for either the Mets or the Yankees?!  Know what? Screw Manhattan.
  • “Men who follow the Mets are slightly more likely to have stopped their
    education during or just after high school.”  No comment.
  • “Male Mets fans were 43% more likely than Yankees fans to drink beer.
    They also drink more in general: the percentage of male Yankees fans who
    said they don’t drink was almost double that of their Mets counterparts
    (30% to 16%).”  OK, screw Yankees fans too.
  • “Mets fans owned more guns (11% versus 5%).”  Maybe I’ll lighten up on the Mets bashing . . .
  • “Mets fans had the Yankees fans beat in one telling category: they seem
    to pay a lot more attention. Not only do they monitor their team’s
    progress more often and make more bets, they listen to substantially
    more sports radio (26% to 17%).”

OK, I know this wasn’t a contest or anything, but if Mets fans listen to more sports talk radio they lose the survey, hands down, because that’s just poor.

Many more fun results in the survey, all of which I’m sure I could spin to aggravate the majority of you if I really felt like it.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.