The differences between Mets fans and Yankees fans

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Mets Yankees logos.jpgThe Wall Street Journal hired a public opinion polling firm to conduct a survey of New Yorkers in an effort to figure out the differences between Mets fans and Yankees fans. Among the results:

  • Sixty percent of the survey’s baseball fans were Yankees fans, 33% were Mets fans. They break down how you’d expect geographically, with more Yankees fans in the Bronx and more Mets fans in Queens, but Manhattan is split down the middle at 19% each. Which means that 62% of baseball fans in Manhattan don’t root for either the Mets or the Yankees?!  Know what? Screw Manhattan.
  • “Men who follow the Mets are slightly more likely to have stopped their
    education during or just after high school.”  No comment.
  • “Male Mets fans were 43% more likely than Yankees fans to drink beer.
    They also drink more in general: the percentage of male Yankees fans who
    said they don’t drink was almost double that of their Mets counterparts
    (30% to 16%).”  OK, screw Yankees fans too.
  • “Mets fans owned more guns (11% versus 5%).”  Maybe I’ll lighten up on the Mets bashing . . .
  • “Mets fans had the Yankees fans beat in one telling category: they seem
    to pay a lot more attention. Not only do they monitor their team’s
    progress more often and make more bets, they listen to substantially
    more sports radio (26% to 17%).”

OK, I know this wasn’t a contest or anything, but if Mets fans listen to more sports talk radio they lose the survey, hands down, because that’s just poor.

Many more fun results in the survey, all of which I’m sure I could spin to aggravate the majority of you if I really felt like it.

Michael Bourn to miss four weeks with a broken finger

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - SEPTEMBER 6:  Michael Bourn #1 of the Baltimore Orioles looks out of the dugout as he waits to get on deck to bat during the sixth inning of a game against the Tampa Bay Rays on September 6, 2016 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Orioles’ center fielder Michael Bourn is expected to be sidelined for four weeks while he rehabs a broken ring finger on his right hand, according to reports from the Baltimore Sun’s Peter Schmuck. Bourn broke the finger while playing catch with a football after a spring training workout.

The veteran outfielder re-signed with the club earlier this week on a minor league deal and was prepared to compete for a bench role this season. He’s in line to receive a $2 million salary if he makes the major league roster and can make an additional $3.5 million in incentives based on a set number of plate appearances. Now, however, his chances of cracking the roster out of spring training look considerably diminished, as his current timetable gives him an approximate return date of March 25 if all goes well.

Bourn had an impressive, if short-lived run with the Orioles following his trade to Baltimore last August, batting .283/.358/.435 with two home runs and a .793 OPS in 55 PA. While still somewhat removed from the totals that brought him an All-Star nod with the Braves in 2012, his defensive chops should give the Orioles some depth in center once he’s healthy again.

Orioles re-sign Paul Janish to minor league deal

SARASOTA, FL - FEBRUARY 28:  Paul Janish #15 of the Baltimore Orioles poses during photo day at Ed Smith Stadium on February 28, 2016 in Sarasota, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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The Orioles signed free agent shortstop Paul Janish to another minor league deal on Saturday, reports Roch Kubatko of MASNsports.com. The contract includes an invite to spring training.

It’s hardly a surprising move for the Orioles, who have released and re-signed the 34-year-old infielder to multiple minor league deals over the past two years. A perennial Triple-A player, Janish slashed .242/.282/.303 with four doubles and a .585 OPS in two campaigns and 28 games with the Orioles. While he won’t be in line for a full-time role in the majors this season, he profiles as a solid defender and should give the team some infield depth alongside fellow veteran infielders Robert Andino, Johnny Giavotella and Chris Johnson.