The differences between Mets fans and Yankees fans


Mets Yankees logos.jpgThe Wall Street Journal hired a public opinion polling firm to conduct a survey of New Yorkers in an effort to figure out the differences between Mets fans and Yankees fans. Among the results:

  • Sixty percent of the survey’s baseball fans were Yankees fans, 33% were Mets fans. They break down how you’d expect geographically, with more Yankees fans in the Bronx and more Mets fans in Queens, but Manhattan is split down the middle at 19% each. Which means that 62% of baseball fans in Manhattan don’t root for either the Mets or the Yankees?!  Know what? Screw Manhattan.
  • “Men who follow the Mets are slightly more likely to have stopped their
    education during or just after high school.”  No comment.
  • “Male Mets fans were 43% more likely than Yankees fans to drink beer.
    They also drink more in general: the percentage of male Yankees fans who
    said they don’t drink was almost double that of their Mets counterparts
    (30% to 16%).”  OK, screw Yankees fans too.
  • “Mets fans owned more guns (11% versus 5%).”  Maybe I’ll lighten up on the Mets bashing . . .
  • “Mets fans had the Yankees fans beat in one telling category: they seem
    to pay a lot more attention. Not only do they monitor their team’s
    progress more often and make more bets, they listen to substantially
    more sports radio (26% to 17%).”

OK, I know this wasn’t a contest or anything, but if Mets fans listen to more sports talk radio they lose the survey, hands down, because that’s just poor.

Many more fun results in the survey, all of which I’m sure I could spin to aggravate the majority of you if I really felt like it.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.