Are general managers underpaid?

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Ken Rosenthal thinks so:

The GM is arguably the most important person in any organization — more
important, perhaps, than even a superstar player.

But
baseball’s dirty little secret is that the sport’s highest-ranking
executives are absurdly underpaid.

Most general managers earn
between $500,000 and $2 million annually, major league sources say. Only a few — notably, the Yankees’ Brian Cashman
Red Sox’s Theo Epstein and Tigers’ Dave Dombrowski — are believed to
make more than $2 million.

Rosenthal doesn’t think GMs are impoverished or anything, but he does believe that, given how critical the right GM is to an organization’s success, there should be greater competition over the best ones, and that in turn should lead to higher salaries.

I think he’s right (and I’ll add that lower-level front office people are criminally-underpaid, far more so than GMs are).  The problem, of course, is that the GM is the one guy who the owner himself hires, so for that decision he doesn’t have the insight of the sharpest guy in most organizations — the general manager.

Why wouldn’t there be a bidding war for a Brian Cashman or a Theo Epstein or guys like them?  Is there a gentleman’s agreement among owners not to do so?  Are they just dense?  Because it strikes me that paying a couple million more in order to get the right guy to run the team would more than pay for itself over time.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.