"Los Suns?" The Dbacks did that years ago

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There was a lot of coverage of the Phoenix Suns’ decision to wear jerseys that said “Los Suns” on them as a protest against Arizona’s immigration law.  The Diamondbacks have been doing that, and more, for years, however.

Back in 2007 the team began a concerted effort to attract the Hispanic fan base, entering into promotional partnerships with media
outlets such as Univision and La Voz and selling tickets at
Phoenix Ranch Market, which caters to Hispanic shoppers.  They also installed new Spanish language signage around Chase Field, and made an effort to market the team under the name “Los Diamantes” because there wasn’t an easy and pithy Spanish translation for “Diamondbacks.”

Such things weren’t political statements. They were reflections of reality. A reality that more than a quarter of Maricopa County residents are Hispanic and that, despite the fact that overall attendance was in decline at Dbacks games, Hispanic attendance had held more or less steady.  When a large portion of your fan base is also among your most loyal fans, you do that sort of thing.

It’s the sort of thing that everyone — both the supporters of the immigration law and those who would boycott the Diamondbacks — should maybe think about a bit.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.