Jermaine Dye doesn't think he'll be playing baseball this summer

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Jermaine Dye headshot.jpgHe didn’t say anything along those lines, but a little bird told me that Jermaine Dye is angling for an invite to the American Century Celebrity Golf
Championship
* that will be held in Lake Tahoe in
mid-July. Or, as we call it around these parts “baseball season.”
That suggests that Dye isn’t exactly confident that he’ll find work in the majors any time soon.

 
But it does kind of jibe with what many commenters and people who know a bit about Dye have said recently: contrary to what many have said (myself included) the guy isn’t pulling some diva routine with his contract demands. He’s simply enjoying his life away from baseball and may decide not to come back due to the lure of family and and relaxation and the many millions he already has in the bank.  Which I can respect.

Of course, there’s no guarantee that he’ll get an invite to the tournament, and even if he does he could cancel if he were
he to be signed by
a team [cough!] Mariners [cough!]. But it does appear as though he’s setting up his life with a post-baseball mindset.

*Full disclosure: NBC Sports is
a major sponsor and is the broadcaster of the tournament. Additional
disclosure: I can’t golf, but I’m telling everyone at NBC that I can and I want to go because my birthday falls during the tourney this year and I hear they give great birthday specials at the Lakeside Inn buffet in Stateline, NV.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

Getty Images
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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.