The Mariners release Eric Byrnes

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Eric Byrnes 2.jpgThe Seattle Mariners released outfielder Eric Byrnes after yesterday’s game against the Rangers. Partially due to ineffectiveness, partially due to plain old weirdness.

The ineffectiveness: Byrnes was three for 32 on the season.

The weirdness: the play on Friday night in which he pulled his bat back on a suicide squeeze, causing Ichiro to get nailed at the plate in the Mariners’ 2-0 loss. He bolted the clubhouse on his bicycle mere minutes after that game, avoiding the media and his general manager, Jack Zduriencik. Also the fact that he didn’t take the bat off his shoulder for three straight pitches with the bases loaded in the
fourth inning yesterday. He’s basically been like Richie Tenenbaum at the U.S. Nationals out there.

I have to guess that the weirdness is why he was released. I mean really, the Mariners are putting up with near-zero in terms of contributions from Ken Griffey and Mike Sweeney, so it’s not like they have an official requirement that their DHs and backup outfielders actually be able to hit or anything. 

But if you’re gonna be useless at the plate, you had better be a good citizen and at least look like you’re trying out there.

Danny Farquhar in critical condition after suffering ruptured aneurysm

Danny Farquhar
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Awful news for the White Sox and reliever Danny Farquhar: the right-hander remains hospitalized with a brain hemorrhage, per a team announcement on Saturday. He’s in stable but critical condition after sustaining a “ruptured aneurysm [that] caused the brain bleed” on Friday.

Farquhar, 31, passed out in the dugout during the sixth inning of Friday’s game against the Astros. He regained consciousness shortly after the incident and was taken to RUSH University Medical Center, where he’s expected to continue treatment with Dr. Demetrius Lopez in the neurological ICU unit.

“It takes your breath away a little bit,” club manager Rick Renteria said following the game. “One of your guys is down there and you have no idea what’s going on. […] When one of your teammates or anybody you know has an episode, even if it’s not a teammate, something is going on, you realize everything else you keep in perspective. Everything has its place. It’s one of our guys, so we are glad he was conscious when he left here.”