More players are speaking out against the Arizona immigration law

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Arizona outline.jpgOver the weekend Drew noted that Adrian Gonzalez said that he would not attend next year’s All-Star Game if selected due to the Arizona’s S.B. 1070 immigration law.  Gonzalez is not the only player speaking out.

The Padres’ Yorvit
Torrealba told the San Diego Union-Tribune
“Why do I want to go play in a place where
every time I go to a restaurant and they don’t understand what I’m
trying to order, they’re going to ask me for ID first? That’s bull. I
come from a crazy country. Now Arizona seems a little bit more crazy.”

Mets catcher Rod Barajas told The New York Times, “If
they happen to pull someone over who looks like they are of Latin
descent, even if they are a U.S. citizen, that is the first question
that is going to be asked. But if a blond-haired, blue-eyed Canadian
gets pulled over, do you think they are going to ask for their papers?
No.”

You can expect more players to weigh in on this.  If nothing changes (i.e. if the Major League Baseball remains silent) the logical conclusion of all of this is (a) a wildcat strike of the All-Star Game by Latino players and those who sympathize with their position; and (b) a presumed backlash by other players who either support the law or who don’t feel it appropriate for baseball to wade into the political arena like this. In other words: ugliness.

As I said the other day, the only way to head this off is for Bud Selig to show some leadership on the matter.  He need not come out in sharp opposition to S.B. 1070, and he need not make any decisions regarding the fate of the 2011 All-Star Game at this time, but it seems essential to me that he publicly acknowledge the feelings of the ballplayers, acknowledge the controversy and offer something approaching an official position for baseball.

If he does that — even with one of his patented “we’ll wait and see how it all plays out” statements which, in this case, may be the best bet — at least the players and the public will know that baseball is paying attention and may dial down the rhetoric for a bit.  If he doesn’t, a good many of those same people are going to think that Bud doesn’t care, and it’s going to draw baseball further into the firestorm than it already is.

Yeah, that’s a political calculation, not a business one, but in this case the business of baseball and politics are on a collision course, so that stuff matters.

Alex Dickerson to miss 2017 season after undergoing back surgery

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Padres’ outfielder Alex Dickerson won’t see PETCO Park anytime soon — at least, not as its starting left fielder. The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a bulging disc in his lower back prior to the start of the 2017 season, and hasn’t made any kind of substantial progress in the months since. According to Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune, he suffered a setback in his recovery process last week and is set to undergo a season-ending discectomy next Wednesday.

Over 285 plate appearances, Dickerson batted .257/.333/.455 with 10 home runs and a .788 OPS for the Padres in 2016. He missed several days with a right hip contusion last July, but hasn’t experienced any substantial health problems since undergoing surgery in 2014 to repair a torn ligament in his left ankle.

The expected recovery period for lower back surgery is 3-4 months, according to Lin, which puts Dickerson’s estimated return just a few days before the end of the regular season. The Padres aren’t scraping the bottom of the NL West, but their 29-44 record doesn’t bode well for a postseason run this year. Assuming Dickerson rehabs his back in a timely manner, he should be in fine form to enter the competition for left field next spring.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.