Red Sox coach blames 'bad habits' from Indians on Victor Martinez's throwing struggles


Rob Bradford of reports that Victor Martinez has tried to improve his woeful throwing numbers by participating in twice-daily workout sessions with catching instructor Gary Tuck.
Tuck praised Martinez’s work ethic while adding that “he came over here with some really bad habits” and “you can’t break them overnight.” I’d be interested to hear the Indians’ response to that, since Tuck is basically saying Cleveland has a terrible coaching staff that hindered Martinez’s development defensively.
However, his throw-out percentage during eight seasons with the Indians was actually decent at 24.5 percent, especially compared to his abysmal rate of 8.3 percent since joining the Red Sox in the middle of last year.
Rather than bad habits, what really seems to have destroyed Martinez’s ability to control the running game is elbow surgery in 2008, because as Bradford notes since returning from that he’s gunned down just 9-of-92 steal attempts. Whatever the case, Martinez finding a way to go from horrendous to merely bad throwing out runners may determine whether the Red Sox make a significant effort to re-sign the impending free agent.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.