Bob Uecker undergoes successful heart surgery

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Bob Uecker broadcasting.jpgTom Haudricort reports that Brewers’ broadcaster Bob Uecker had his heart surgery today and that it was a success:

“As of 2:30 pm, Bob is out of surgery and in the ICU. We are pleased
that Mr. Uecker’s surgery went smoothly today,” said Nicolosi. “We
replaced his aortic valve, aortic root and part of his ascending aorta.
We also did a coronary bypass on one vessel.”

“Our family is thrilled with the outcome of today’s surgery,” said Bob
Uecker, Jr., son of Bob, Sr. “We’re grateful to the staff at Froedtert
for their medical and professional care; they have been terrific every
step of the way. We also want to thank our extended family, friends and
all of the fans who have expressed their concern for my father;  we
appreciate their thoughtful and kind wishes.”

Per previous reports, Uecker will remain in the hospital for 5-7 days and should be fully recovered by the time the Brewers are mathematically eliminated from the division race.

Or 12 weeks, whichever comes first.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.