Are there some players who just can't hack it in New York?

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Javier Vazquez cap.jpgI’m extremely reluctant to give credence to the “Player X just can’t handle New York” line of reasoning because as explanations go, it rarely if ever accounts for all of the variables.

Javy Vazquez is a good example, inasmuch as that meme doesn’t account for the fact that he handled things just fine in New York until he got hurt back in 2004. Something else is almost always going on when a guy is playing poorly for the Yankees or any other team — maybe many something elses — and if we care at all about figuring out what it is, we’re best to leave unverifiable, unquantifiable blanket explanations out of the equation until there is nothing else available.

But you know what? Sometimes you may not have any other explanation. Take pitcher Ed Whitson. As ESPN’s Ian O’Connor writes, the fact of being in New York seems to have been his biggest problem during his brief tenure with the Yankees back in the mid-80s:

“It’s like working in an office and your boss comes in and says, ‘You
suck,’ after you’ve tried your best,” Whitson said. “Now multiply that
by 50,000 bosses, all of them telling you that you suck, and imagine
what that feels like.

“You feel like everybody’s against
you, and sometimes you just want to quit. But you can’t ever quit.”

Some people are just wired to be more sensitive to criticism than others. I have no idea if Javy Vazquez is one of those people or if his struggles this year are a function of playing in New York. And given that there’s still a lot of season to go and scores of reasons why any one pitcher can struggle, I’ll probably be the last guy to hop on that train when assessing Vazquez. Let’s talk about his decreased velocity first, ya know?

But “he just can’t handle New York” is not a wholly fictitious concept. There are extremes to the place that major leaguers don’t face in San Diego, where Whitson thrived, or the Columbus, Ohio suburbs where he now lives.

I suspect that the vast majority of ballplayers face more pressure simply making it up through the ranks to the bigs than they face from a hostile crowd or press corps, thereby rendering the pressures of New York relatively quaint, but it can’t be said for absolutely everyone.

Adrian Beltre puts his helmet on backwards to face a switch pitcher

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“A” switch pitcher is probably not the most accurate way to put that. It’s more like “The” switch pitcher, as Pat Venditte of the Mariners is the only one extant.

Last night the right-handed hitting Adrian Beltre had to face Venditte, who obviously chose to pitch righty to the Rangers third baseman. Before coming up to the plate, Beltre jokingly donned his helmet backwards and pretended that he’d hit left-handed:

 

He needn’t have bothered. Beltre doubled to left field off of Venditte, showing that at some point, platoon splits really don’t matter.

MLB, MLBPA donate $250,000 for Louisiana flood relief

BATON ROUGE, LA - AUGUST 15:  Richard Schafer navigates a boat past a flooded home on August 15, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Record-breaking rains pelted Louisiana over the weekend leaving the city with historic levels of flooding that have caused at least seven deaths and damaged thousands of homes.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association announced this morning that they are contributing $250,000 to assist victims of the devastating floods that recently hit Louisiana.

The $250,000 contribution is being divided among three charitable organizations: The American Red Cross will receive a $125,000 contribution and two charities connected to Major League Players – the Baton Rouge Area Foundation and High Socks for Hope – will each receive a $62,500 contribution.

According to the joint press release, several players with connections to the area, including Reid Brignac, Will Harris, Wade LeBlanc, Mikie Mahtook, Anthony Ranaudo and Ryan Schimpf were consulted in determining which organizations would receive funding support.

Nice move, union and league.