MLB, Twitter, and 'strongly worded suggestions'

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As a follow-up to my MLB/Twitter report from earlier this week, I’m told that what I called a “ban” on MLB.com writers using their Twitter accounts for non-baseball topics was really more like “a strongly worded suggestion” (that every writer followed, since that’s what happens when your employer makes a strong suggestion). To me that sounds like semantics, but fair enough. My apologies for the overstatement.
As you may recall, however, an MLB spokesperson denied the entire premise of my report and told me they were “mystified” by the mere notion of any changes related to MLB.com writers and Twitter. Which is funny, since all the MLB.com writers received an e-mail memo with the “strongly worded suggestion” and several of them quickly created separate Twitter accounts as a result.
Also amusing given the whole “mystified” thing is that any tweets from MLB.com writers mentioning the Twitter-related changes were deleted yesterday, which seems odd if there’s nothing to the report and the whole thing is false. Anyway, this isn’t exactly an earth-shattering story and I’ll probably give it a rest now, but MLB denying the entire premise of something that’s clearly based in fact has been frustrating and strange.
Apparently the MLB spokesperson didn’t inform Mark Gonzalez of the Chicago Tribune that the whole thing was make believe, because he has this report today:

It turns out that the Twitter policy sent to each of the 30 Major League teams applies to non-uniformed personnel only. White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen said he didn’t receive an e-mail that was sent to front office members of every major league team. Sox third baseman Mark Teahen said he was informed of the Sox’s Twitter policy from a member of the Sox’s traveling party but didn’t realize the memo was for non-uniformed personnel only.

Setting aside the silliness of MLB denying the existence of something sent to 30 teams and every MLB.com writer, that news from Gonzalez is very positive in that managers like Ozzie Guillen and players like Mark Teahen aren’t subject to any “bans” or “strongly worded suggestions” or whatever you want to call it. We may have lost the ability to see the MLB.com writers’ personalities in between lineup postings, but at least Denard Span can still use Twitter to complain about umpiring.

Dodgers activate Adrian Gonzalez

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The Dodgers have reinstated first baseman Adrian Gonzalez from the 60-day disabled list after his recovery from a herniated disc. To make room for him they have optioned Rob Segedin to Triple-A Oklahoma City.

Gonzalez last played on June 11. Since then the Dodgers have gone an astounding 46-9, with shoe-in rookie of the year candidate Cody Bellinger handling first base duties and posting a .978 OPS. When Gonzalez went down he was hitting .255/.304/.339 and only one homer in 49 games.

It’ll be interesting to see what kind of playing time he gets going forward. The Dodgers, of course, have a comfortable lead in the NL West, so they could afford to allow Gonzalez to play a good bit to see if his bat sharpens up while simultaneously giving Bellinger, who has never played more than 137 games in a season, a bit of a breather. Beyond that, though, the Dodgers ain’t broke, so it’s hard to see why anyone would want to tinker with things.

Rays activate Kevin Kiermaier

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The Tampa Bay Rays have activated outfielder Kevin Kiermaier from the 60-day disabled list.

Kiermaier, who fractured his hip in early June, is batting leadoff and playing center field in tonight’s game against the Mariners. He was just 3-for-24 on his rehab assignment, but those aren’t usually predictive of anything. He was hitting .258/.329/.408 when he went down. Getting his bat — and, more importantly, his glove — back in the lineup will boost the struggling Rays in their quest for a playoff spot.