Ned Colletti calls out Matt Kemp

29 Comments

colletti.jpgNed Colletti has determined that the best way to light a fire under the Dodgers is to rip Matt Kemp. After criticizing Kemp’s baserunning and defense to Peter Tilden of 790-KABC, he said:

“Why is it? Because he got a new deal? Can’t tell you. But you
know, it’s below-average. If this is the last day of the season and
people are voting for the Gold Glove, his name is not even on the
ballot. It’s a shame that he would go from where he was a year ago to
revert back to when the ball goes up in the air and you’re not sure
where it’s going, or if it’s going to get caught.”

I’ll grant that Kemp hasn’t been as stellar on defense this year as he was all last year, but if Ned Colletti thinks that the team is 8-12 because Kemp isn’t running everything down he’s nuts. The Dodgers are 8-12 because the only team with worse pitching in the National League is the Pittsburgh Pirates, who at least have the excuse of being the Pittsburgh Pirates. But even the Pirates didn’t place their hopes and dreams in Vicente Padilla and every Tom, Dick and Harry Ortiz who wandered into Camelback, Arizona between February and April. That’s all on you, Ned, so if you want to rip someone, take a long look in the mirror.

And when you’re done doing that, remember that no GM who calls himself a professional rips his own players in the media, let alone his best player. His best player who decided to go year-to-year though arbitration rather than sign a long term deal and thus could very well bolt in a couple of years if he decides that getting called out by the boss on a radio show is not the sort of franchise for whom he wishes to serve as a cornerstone.

This is low rent behavior from an organization that has been called a lot of things in its history, but never low rent. Colletti ought to be ashamed of himself.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.