MLB denies Twitter crackdown, but facts say otherwise

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After posting my story last night about MLB.com writers being banned from using Twitter for non-baseball topics and MLB players being told their tweets will be monitored, I was contacted by a spokesperson for MLB who essentially said I was 100 percent wrong. In fact, he went so far as to say my story was so “factually inaccurate” it had the good folks at MLB “mystified by all of this.”
Prior to posting the story I spoke to multiple MLB and MLB.com employees, each of whom made it very clear that the beat reporters were told to cease using their current Twitter accounts for anything other than coverage of the team. Several MLB.com writers even made announcements to that effect on their Twitter pages, although within hours those messages had (coincidentally, I’m sure) been deleted.
Beyond that, it was the talk of press boxes across baseball last night, with dozens of non-MLB.com beat writers tweeting about the fact that their MLB.com colleagues could no longer post non-baseball notes on Twitter. White Sox third baseman Mark Teahen also spoke to Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun-Times about the players angle. In other words, the notion that my story could have possibly “mystified” anyone at MLB was absurd and struck me as an attempt to mislead.
Eventually the MLB spokesperson pulled back the reins a bit on the denial, but still insisted that no policy changes have been made. That flies in the face of everything I was told by multiple sources involved, all the notes posted on Twitter last night by both MLB.com and non-MLB.com reporters discussing the issue, and the fact that several MLB.com beat writers chose last night to create new, personal Twitter accounts.
I asked MLB for an official statement, but they refused and simply continued to insist my story was inaccurate. If and when they’d like to clarify things on the record I’m willing to clarify, update, or correct my reporting, but in the meantime what’s going on here seems rather obvious and I’m more than comfortable letting things speak for themselves.
UPDATE: In addition to deleting any tweets about the Twitter ban issue, MLB.com writers have now deleted their posts about creating new, personal Twitter accounts. Just another coincidence, I’m sure.

Video: Ian Kinsler homers in WBC final, rounds bases solemnly

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Ian Kinsler found himself in hot water on Wednesday evening when he criticized the way players from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic play baseball. It is his hope that kids watching the World Baseball Classic decide to emulate the emotionless way players from the U.S. play baseball as opposed to the exciting, cheerful way players from other countries tend to play the game.

Needless to say, Kinsler’s comments didn’t sit well with many people, but he has the most recent laugh. Kinsler broke a scoreless tie in the top of the third inning of Wednesday night’s WBC final against Puerto Rico, slugging a two-run home run to left-center field at Dodger Stadium off of Seth Lugo.

Kinsler, of course, rounded the bases solemnly which is sure to highlight just how cool and exciting the game of baseball is to international viewers.

Jered Weaver dealing with “dead arm”

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Padres starter Jered Weaver lasted just two-thirds of an inning in Wednesday afternoon’s Cactus League appearance against the Royals. He yielded four runs on three hits, throwing 31 pitches before getting pulled. His spring ERA now sits at an ugly 10.13.

Weaver said he’s been dealing with a “dead arm” since his last bullpen session, but added he’s dealt with the issue in previous springs, Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

The Padres signed Weaver to a one-year, $3 million contract last month. The right-hander is coming off of the worst season of his 11-year career. His fastball averaged a career-low 83 MPH and he put up a 5.06 ERA with a 103/51 K/BB ratio in 178 innings.