Miguel Olivo has kidney stones, is a tough guy

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Troy Renck of the Denver Post reports that Miguel Olivo passed two kidney stones Monday … and still started at catcher for the Rockies and played all nine innings behind the plate that night.
By comparison, I’m giving serious thought to taking the rest of the day off after writing about his kidney stones.
Mike Cameron also passed a kidney stone last week before going on the disabled list with a strained abdominal muscle and Brian Roberts was initially thought to have kidney stones this spring before being diagnosed with back spasms instead.
Olivo has actually gone through this before, spending time on the disabled list with kidney stones back in 2004. And here I thought Chris Iannetta was the Rockies catcher to feel sorry for. Also, if the mere mention of “kidney stone” doesn’t make you squirm, read this and get back to me.
UPDATE: OK, so apparently not only did Olivo pass two kidney stones Monday, he did so during the game. Here’s the story from Jim Armstrong of the Denver Post:

We take you to the eighth inning of the Rockies-Diamondbacks game Monday night, when Miguel Olivo passed a kidney stone in the bathroom adjacent to the dugout. The amazing part is what he did a few minutes later. He strapped on his catching gear and returned to his crouch behind home plate. “Believe me, it’s not fun,” said Olivo. “Sometimes, when I’ve got that thing, I just want to die. But I can handle pain a little bit. Once it’s gone, I’m normal, I’m good. Let’s play baseball.”

Yeesh.

Jenny Cavnar to call Rockies play-by-play on Monday night

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According to former major leaguer and current broadcaster Ryan Spilborghs, Jenny Cavnar will be calling play-by-play of Monday night’s game against the Padres for the Rockies. The broadcast will be on AT&T Sportsnet Rocky Mountain Region.

Cavnar will be at least the third woman to call televised play-by-play for a major league team, joining Gayle Gardner (Rockies, 1993) and Suzyn Waldman (Yankees, mid-1990’s).

Broadcasting remains largely the domain of white men, so it’s always good when women and people of color are able to have a seat in the broadcasting booth.