Miguel Olivo has kidney stones, is a tough guy

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Troy Renck of the Denver Post reports that Miguel Olivo passed two kidney stones Monday … and still started at catcher for the Rockies and played all nine innings behind the plate that night.
By comparison, I’m giving serious thought to taking the rest of the day off after writing about his kidney stones.
Mike Cameron also passed a kidney stone last week before going on the disabled list with a strained abdominal muscle and Brian Roberts was initially thought to have kidney stones this spring before being diagnosed with back spasms instead.
Olivo has actually gone through this before, spending time on the disabled list with kidney stones back in 2004. And here I thought Chris Iannetta was the Rockies catcher to feel sorry for. Also, if the mere mention of “kidney stone” doesn’t make you squirm, read this and get back to me.
UPDATE: OK, so apparently not only did Olivo pass two kidney stones Monday, he did so during the game. Here’s the story from Jim Armstrong of the Denver Post:

We take you to the eighth inning of the Rockies-Diamondbacks game Monday night, when Miguel Olivo passed a kidney stone in the bathroom adjacent to the dugout. The amazing part is what he did a few minutes later. He strapped on his catching gear and returned to his crouch behind home plate. “Believe me, it’s not fun,” said Olivo. “Sometimes, when I’ve got that thing, I just want to die. But I can handle pain a little bit. Once it’s gone, I’m normal, I’m good. Let’s play baseball.”

Yeesh.

MLBPA agrees to extend deadline for new posting agreement between MLB, NPB

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Update (7:00 PM ET): The MLBPA announces that the deadline has been extended 24 hours while MLB and NPB continue to negotiate a new agreement for the posting system. The new deadline is 8 PM ET on Tuesday.

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.