Milton Bradley returns to Chicago, says things

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bradley headshot.JPGNaturally, reporters and columnists were licking their chops for Milton Bradley’s return to Chicago this weekend, so even though he didn’t play on Friday due to a sore left calf, it was awful nice of him to throw everyone a bone by continuing to say some rather silly things.

Here’s a sample, via Scot Gregor of the Arlington Daily Herald:

“As a black man playing this game, I just don’t feel like
… you know, the majority of the media is middle-aged white guys, so I
don’t think you can accurately construe what I have to say, or portray
me as who I am, because you don’t know,” Bradley said. “You don’t know
where I come from, nobody has ever asked those questions. They just see
what they see. I never carried a gun, I never hurt anybody, but I am
made out to be something I’m not.”

Not sure about you, but I’m making him out to be an injury-prone .167 hitter who has already had a couple sit-downs with manager Don Wakamatsu. Meanwhile, Carlos Silva is an improbable 2-0 with an 0.95 ERA, 0.63 WHIP and a 12/2 K/BB ratio over his first three starts with the Cubs; success that played a large part in sending Carlos Zambrano to the bullpen.

Of course, logic dictates that Silva will eventually be, well, Carlos Silva, and Bradley will start to get on base at a healthy clip, but what if that doesn’t happen? Seattle can’t be the baseball Siberia he seeks if he doesn’t start to perform. And soon.
 

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.