The latest on HGH testing: Bud embarks on another "study"

9 Comments

HGH.jpgBud Selig says baseball’s new science adviser — Dr. Gary Green — is examining the human growth hormone blood
test
that the World Anti-Doping Agency (“WADA”) is peddling but he isn’t sure when
the study will be completed.

This is classic Bud: when he doesn’t want to deal with something he commissions another “study.”  I’m assuming that the HGH test study will be complete some time after the “What should we do with the Athletics” study, which has been pending for well over a year now despite the fact that everyone knows what the result will be. I’ve been critical of that particular bit of foot-dragging, but in the case of the HGH test I’m just fine with it.

Why? Because the WADA HGH test is basically useless, because WADA is a publicity and profit-seeking shakedown operation, and that because no one ever calls them on it, Selig is damned if he does and damned if he doesn’t.

As Murray Chass noted yesterday WADA’s head — Dr. Gary Wadler — is the go-to quote of choice whenever a steroids story pops up, selling his organization’s agenda and products as though he were an independent scholar or something. The effect of this is that anyone who exhibits opposition to WADA, even on legitimate grounds, has come to be seen by the media and the public as not being serious about combating PED use. And that’s even the case if the WADA product in question — an HGH blood test — is of dubious efficacy.

Bud Selig and baseball were late to the anti-PED party, but they’re pretty well-versed in it now. They know that WADA’s blood test has caught exactly one offender in several years, and even then it was because the authorities were tipped off about the guy using drugs beforehand. Because of that, they know that it’s probably a useless test that they’d never be able to sell to the players’ union.

But they also know that simply rejecting it out of hand would make them appear soft on PEDs and would lead to a bunch of articles — with critical quotes from Dr. Gary Wadler, natch — excoriating them. Articles that fail to note that the same man tut-tutting baseball is out to make a buck.

So what to do about it? Stall! Commission a study. Punt the issue for several months if not longer. And you know what? It’s the smart play.

Ian Kinsler lists the five toughest pitchers in the AL Central

Duane Burleson/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Every now and then, The Players’ Tribune runs a “five toughest” feature. In 2015, David Ortiz listed the five toughest pitchers he ever faced. Last month, Christian Yelich wrote up the five toughest pitchers in the NL East. Now, it’s Ian Kinsler‘s turn with the five toughest pitchers in the AL Central.

Kinsler goes into detail explaining why each pitcher is difficult to face, so hop over to The Players’ Tribune for his reasoning. His list

Presumably, Kinsler intentionally omitted his Tiger teammates from the list. He has faced Justin Verlander a fair amount earlier in his career, and he has only a .176/.333/.235 batting line in 42 plate appearances against the right-hander. Verlander’s stuff is often described as tough to hit in one phrase or another. Kinsler has also struggled against Indians starter Carlos Carrasco (.590 OPS), but one can understand why he would be omitted from a list of five given who was already listed.

Angels demote C.J. Cron to Triple-A

Stephen Dunn/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Angels first baseman C.J. Cron hit a grand slam against the Mets on Sunday, but it wasn’t enough to keep his spot on the major league roster as the club announced his demotion to Triple-A Salt Lake on Monday. Infielder Nolan Fantana has been promoted from Salt Lake.

Cron, 27, was hitting a disappointing .232/.281/.305 with one home run and RBI in 90 plate appearances. I guess you can say that wasn’t the kind of Cron job the Angels were expecting. Cron was an above-average hitter in each of his first three seasons, finishing with an OPS+, or adjusted OPS, of 111, 106, and 115 (100 is average).

While Cron is figuring things out in the minors, Luis Valbuena, Jefry Marte, and Albert Pujols could each see some time at first base.