Is K-Rod old school, or is he being abused?

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Francisco Rodriguez 3.jpgI have a lot of friends in academia. When they talk about the things they love about that world, they talk about the free exchange of opposing viewpoints. The ability to lay one’s intellectual cards upon the table and engage with those who subscribe to competing philosophical creeds in pitched, but respectful battle. What they love the most is that, though tempers may flare from time to time over the issues of the day, collegiality reigns supreme, because they are all ultimately there for the same purpose: to further the Knowledge of Man.

Which is kind of what it’s like at the New York Post:

In many ways [Francisco] Rodriguez really does have the soul of those old-time
stoppers, the ones who growled for the ball every day and pitched as
long as they needed to. Someone asked K-Rod if he’d be available to
pitch tonight, against the Braves, despite the five outs and 25 pitches. “Of course I am,” he said, in a tone that surely would’ve made
the Goose proud.

That’s the Post’s Mike Vaccaro, practically lionizing K-Rod for getting a five-out save against the Cubs last night.  But wait! Who’s that strolling into the lecture hall?  Why, it’s Professor Sherman!

Jerry Manuel is desperate . . . Manuel already has used Fernando
Nieve in 11 games, the most in the majors. That is a pace of 111 relief
appearances for the season. Manuel also ridiculously had Francisco Rodriguez warm up between 8-10
times last Saturday in the 20-inning game against the Cardinals and
then asked for a five-out save last night against the Cubs.
Pushing relievers now will cost the Mets at some time this season.

They clearly disagree on last night’s K-Rod save. I’m leaning Vaccaro’s way, because I think it’s ridiculous that anyone would pay a relief pitcher what Rodriguez makes and never ask him to pitch more than one inning. But I suppose reasonable people may differ on this point, and I tend to agree with Sherman’s points about Fernando
Nieve.

But isn’t that the beauty of academia? We can argue about these points all day long and, even if we never come to agreement, we are all enriched by the process of debate.  Kudos to the New York Post for allowing itself to serve as the marketplace of ideas!

Albert Pujols passes Mark McGwire with 584th career home run

CLEVELAND, OH - AUGUST 11: Albert Pujols #5 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim runs out a double during the ninth inning against the Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field on August 11, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. The Indians defeated the Angels 14-3. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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Angels DH Albert Pujols passed Mark McGwire for sole possession of 10th place on baseball’s all-time home run leaderboard, slugging his 584th career home run in the first inning of Wednesday night’s game against the Blue Jays.

Mike Trout had already slugged a solo home run off of Jays starter Marco Estrada to bring Pujols to the dish. Pujols jumped on an 0-1 cut fastball, sending it out to left-center field, clearing the fence by a few feet.

Pujols, who finished 4-for-4 with the homer and an RBI double, is batting .257/.321/.441 with 24 home runs and 99 RBI on the year. His next target on the home run leaderboard is Frank Robinson at 586.

Zach Britton allowed an earned run for the first time since April 30

BALTIMORE, MD - AUGUST 22:  Zach Britton #53 of the Baltimore Orioles pitches for his 38th save in the ninth inning during a baseball game against the the Washington Nationals at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on August 22, 2016 in Baltimore, Maryland.  The Oriole won 4-3.  (Photo by Mitchell Layton/Getty Images)
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Orioles closer Zach Britton had appeared in a major league record 43 consecutive games without allowing an earned run, spanning May 5 to August 22. That streak came to an end on Wednesday evening against the Nationals.

The Orioles entered the bottom of the ninth inning holding a 10-3 lead, but reliever Parker Bridwell immediately found himself in hot water. He yielded back-to-back singles to Danny Espinosa and Clint Robinson. He was able to strike out Trea Turner, but walked Jayson Werth to load the bases. Daniel Murphy then crushed his first career grand slam to make it a 10-7 game. That prompted manager Buck Showalter to bring in Britton.

Britton, too, was knocked around. He served up a single to Bryce Harper, followed by a double to Anthony Rendon that scored Harper, pushing the score to 10-8 and ending Britton’s streak. Wilson Ramos reached on a fielder’s choice back to Britton, but the lefty finally finished the game by getting Ryan Zimmerman to ground into a game-ending 4-6-3 double play.

Britton now holds a nice 0.69 ERA with 38 saves and a 61/16 K/BB ratio in 52 innings of work this season.