Just when I didn't think the Cubs could get more foolish…

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There are nine active pitchers with at least 100 victories and a win-loss percentage better than .600:
1. Johan Santana
2. Roy Halladay
3. Roy Oswalt
4. Tim Hudson
5. Andy Pettitte
6. CC Sabathia
7. Chris Carpenter
8. Josh Beckett
9. Carlos Zambrano
This is just a guess, but I don’t think the teams that control any of the first eight are weighing conversions to relief.
Ever since he landed his big contract, we’ve been told Carlos Zambrano isn’t a winner.
The Cubs, though, have played .518 ball during Zambrano’s seven seasons as a full-time starting pitcher. Zambrano, over that stretch, has a 100-58 record, good for a .632 winning percentage. Subtracting Zambrano’s 158 decisions from the Cubs’ mark leaves the team, remarkably enough, 487-487.
Sticking Zambrano in the bullpen is really the most boneheaded move the Cubs could have made. Sticking him in left field would have made as much sense. Zambrano, after all, has 16 homers in 314 at-bats since the beginning of 2006. Alfonso Soriano has eight homers in his past 314 at-bats.
Zambrano’s stuff hasn’t gone anywhere. He got lit up on Opening Day, but then, he usually gets lit up on Opening Day. The Cubs knew that and started him anyway. Zambrano has a history of tensing up in big situations, making him a possible timebomb in a late-inning role. Maybe he’ll be great. Maybe he’ll be the terrific seventh- and eighth-inning guy the Cubs need.
But Zambrano was pretty much a lock to be an above average starter this year. Ryan Dempster is the only other one of those the Cubs have. Ted Lilly’s health remains in doubt. It’s possible I’ve underestimated Randy Wells, but I don’t like his middling fastball and strikeout rate. Carlos Silva is due for an eight-run first inning anytime now, and while I like Tom Gorzelanny, he’s not someone who can be counted on.
So, no, I don’t think it’s too early to write off the Cubs for 2010. Zambrano’s shift will probably prove temporary, but this is a team in disarray. The NL Central won’t be up for grabs unless the Cardinals hit a mess of injuries, and I doubt the Cubs will prove better than then second place teams from the NL East or West.

Aaron Judge’s record strikeout streak ends at 37 games

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For the first time in a month and a half, Aaron Judge went an entire game without striking out, ending his record streak at 37 games. Judge had an RBI single and three walks in Tuesday night’s 13-4 victory over the Tigers.

Judge went 1-for-4 with a solo home run and zero strikeouts in a 9-4 loss to the Brewers on July 7. Between July 8 and August 20, Judge would strike out in all 37 games, breaking the record previously held by Adam Dunn, who struck out in the first 32 games of the 2012 season. If one counted streaks extending into multiple seasons, Dunn held the record at 36 games as he struck out in his final four games in 2011 as well.

After Tuesday’s performance, Judge is now hitting .284/.417/.594 with 37 home runs, 81 RBI, and 93 runs scored in 525 plate appearances on the season. He’s had a particularly rough second half, as he entered Tuesday with a .684 OPS since the All-Star break, a far cry from his 1.139 OPS before the break.

Video: Adrian Gonzalez doubles for his 2,000th career hit

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Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez was able to get a ground ball past Pirates first baseman Josh Bell for a double leading off the top of the sixth inning of Tuesday night’s game. He would come around to score later in the inning on a Corey Seager single, breaking a 1-1 tie.

The double gave Gonzalez 2,000 hits for his career. He is the 282nd player in baseball history and the 11th active player to reach 2,000 career hits. Gonzalez also has 300 home runs, making him one of 94 players with at least 300 dingers and 2,000 hits.

Gonzalez, who was recently activated from the disabled list, entered Tuesday’s action hitting .247/.295/.330 with one home run and 25 RBI in 201 plate appearances on the season.