Chad Billingsley and the Dodgers are searching for answers

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Chad Billingsley made his first All-Star team last season by going 9-4 with a 3.38 ERA in the first half, but then struggled so much in the second half that he was nearly left off the Dodgers’ postseason roster and has now allowed 14 runs in 14 innings this year.
Through mid-June of last season Billingsley was 44-22 with a 3.28 ERA in 530.1 career innings, and at just 24 years old looked like one of the most promising young starters in baseball. Since then he’s 4-8 with a 5.43 ERA in 117.2 innings, including back-to-back clunkers.
Joe Torre has made it clear that he’s sticking with Billingsley in the rotation, suggesting that a lack of confidence is to blame for his collapse. Billingsley disagrees:

That’s not an issue. I’ve been feeling good on the mound, as far as my delivery, my pitches. My arm feels good, my pitches feel good, my mechanics feel good. You have these times. I’m not going out there and walking guys. I’m going after guys. I’m making them beat me. I made some good pitches. I wasn’t walking guys.



As far as everything I wanted to work on between last start and this start, I thought I accomplished it. I mean … honestly, I don’t know. Last year, the second half, I felt like I was battling myself. I couldn’t repeat my delivery. Now, I feel like I’m repeating my delivery consistently. I’m throwing the ball in areas that I want to. I thought I was throwing quality pitches.

He’s obviously just searching for answers, but the problem for Billingsley is that if he’s right and confidence, mechanics, and command aren’t to blame then he’s either injured (which seemingly hasn’t even been hinted at) or simply no longer a good pitcher (which would be pretty unlikely at age 25). Every player goes through slumps, but 120 innings of 5.50 ERA pitching from a 25-year-old who began his career with 530 innings of 3.40 ERA pitching sure seems like something beyond that.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.