Union head: "The Pirates have a plan"

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It was a big deal when the MLBPA went after the Florida Marlins a few months ago, essentially accusing them of pocketing revenue sharing money and not investing enough  to improve the team anywhere apart from the bottom line.  It was a serious enough criticism that even Major League Baseball agreed and the league, the union and the Marlins entered into an agreement pursuant to which the Marlins will raise their payroll over the next few years.

When that all went down fingers pointed at the other low-payroll, revenue sharing-receiving teams, and people wondered when they would be similarly pursued. Speculation immediately focused on the Pirates, who have cut payroll substantially in recent years despite moving into a nice new ballpark.

But you can forget about going after the Pirates. Union head Michael Weiner likes what they’re doing just fine:

“Are we happy with the current state of the Pirates’ payroll? Of
course we’d like to see it higher. Is it tough to see when they sign a player
like Nate McLouth and then trade him? Is it tough to see some of the
other things they’ve done? Sure. But, to date, we have been convinced
the Pirates have a plan.

“You guys have as beautiful a ballpark as there is in
the major leagues. You’ve got a phenomenal fan base and history.
(Ownership has) a plan in place, so we’ll continue to monitor it. We’ve
been satisfied so far.”

Those comments were made to students at at Penn State’s Dickinson School of Law.  Inherent in those comments, I think, is an acknowledgment that the Pirates are at a very different place on the success cycle than are the Marlins. Indeed, the shortest path between losing and winning for the Pirates is through lower payroll and giving young kids a chance as opposed to paying for more older veterans who won’t be around the next time the team has a chance to win. Compare this with the Marlins who have, for the past couple of years anyway, been a player or two away from being serious playoff contenders.

The union is often accused of being interested in nothing other than high salaries. And to be fair, getting high salaries for its members is part of its mission.  But there’s some reality and pragmatism afoot in today’s MLBPA, and this is some evidence of it.

Brandon McCarthy wins final spot in Dodgers’ rotation

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We learned on Monday that Hyun-Jin Ryu won one of the final two spots in the Dodgers’ starting rotation. Brandon McCarthy has won the other, Bill Plunkett of the Orange County Register reports. Alex Wood was McCarthy’s competitor for the spot.

McCarthy, 33, posted a 4.85 ERA across four appearances spanning 13 innings this spring, yielding seven earned runs on 14 hits and a walk with seven strikeouts. Wood, a southpaw, gave up five earned runs in six innings against the Reds on Tuesday, which might have factored into the decision.

Last season, McCarthy made nine starts and one relief appearance, posting a 4.95 ERA with a 44/26 K/BB ratio in 40 innings. In the event McCarthy falters, the club has Wood as well as Julio Urias and the injured Scott Kazmir as potential replacements.

Yankees re-sign Jon Niese to a minor league deal

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The Yankees have re-signed pitcher Jon Niese to a minor league contract, George A. King III of the New York Post reports. Niese was released on Sunday, but he’ll stick around and provide rotation depth for the Yankees.

Niese had knee surgery last August and got a late start to spring training as a result. In six spring appearances lasting an inning each, the lefty gave up three earned runs on five hits and a walk with five strikeouts.

Niese, a veteran of nine seasons, put up an aggregate 5.50 ERA with an 88/47 K/BB ratio in 121 innings last season between the Pirates and Mets.