Johnny Damon has a mohawk

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When I started this gig I was so smitten with my personal freedom and the lack of any expectation to maintain a professional appearance that I grew out a big ugly beard. After a month or two the concept of rebelling got old so I shaved it off.

Johnny Damon is going through the same thing right about now. Freed from the need to keep his hair short and shave now that he’s no longer a member of Yankees, Inc., Damon was a bit scruffy in the spring and the early regular season. But now he’s realized that one need not rebel. One can simply move on. Sort of.

If there were any Johnny Damon fans still holding onto hope that he’d
grow his hair out again now that he’s out of New York, Monday might’ve
been the final blow against that. He emerged in the visiting clubhouse
at Angel Stadium with a mohawk-style cut.

Ever since Damon signed with the Tigers in February, there’s been the
lingering question of whether he would grow out his hair or grow out a
beard now that he’s no longer under the Yankees’ rules on hair length
and facial hair.

Damon has never really gotten into the speculation, and by the sounds of
his remarks, he definitely isn’t into the long hair.
“I’ve been wanting one of these for a long time,” Damon said. “That long
hair is long gone out of my system.”

The real tragedy of this is that no one thought to snap a picture of Damon’s mohawk. If anyone sees one, please let me know.  I’m picturing a perfect cross between DeNiro during the climax of “Taxi Driver” and Ricky “The Dragon” Steamboat.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.