Hundreds protest extending the draft to the Dominican Republic

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Thumbnail image for dominican republic flag.jpgNick Collias MLB Trade Rumors has a must-read story up this morning about a protest which took place outside the hotel in which MLB Dominican baseball czar, Sandy Alderson, was staying last week. The purpose: opposing the implementation of an amateur draft in the Dominican Republic, which is high on Bud Selig’s list for the next Collective Bargaining Agreement. 

As I’ve written in the past, the biggest concern of a draft in the Dominican Republic is that it will harm baseball there the way it has in Puerto Rico since it was brought into the draft in 1990. Puerto Ricans complain that the draft killed the player development model there. The declining number of Puerto Rican ballplayers in the U.S. bears that out, at least in part. The protesters believe that an international draft will gut baseball in the D.R. and that it will push would-be ballplayers into lives of crime, social displacement and disorder.

ESPN’s Jorge Arangure has disputed the notion that a draft will harm baseball in the Dominican Republic like it has in the Puerto Rico, writing last month that the financial incentives in play in the former are much stronger than in the latter.  It’s an interesting point, and one those who oppose the draft have yet to counter.

Given the agendas of everyone involved — both those in favor and opposed to a draft have both financial and non-financial motives — the social and business implications of a draft in the Dominican Republic are hard to suss out. One goal everyone can agree on, it seems, would be not to leave the D.R. worse off than it was before.

To that end, here’s an idea that would (a) address the protestors’ concerns regarding social dislocation; (b) remedy the often exploitative history of baseball in the Dominican Republic; and (c) help everyone out financially, at least in the long run: In exchange for everyone agreeing on the draft, Major League Baseball can enact a policy in which they agree to provide a basic education to every young man who is drafted and/or signed. 

Why should baseball do this? because as of now over 90% of the guys they sign devote their teens to baseball, don’t make it to even the minor leagues, and are left out on the street by the time they hit their 20s.  If a draft comes into play these guys will continue on as even less well-paid chattles than they are now, and providing an education for them will help lessen the socioeconomic blow.  In exchange, baseball could demand and expect greater help from the government in addressing its own problems, such as age fraud, steroids and the other nastiness inherent in the system. Win-win, as they say.

That’s not my idea, by the way, it’s the idea of a young lawyer named Adam Wasch who proposed it in a law review article last year.  It’s a good read as far as law review articles go, and will teach you an awful lot about what goes down in the Dominican Republic, baseball-wise.  The major takeaway for me:  Neither the current system of unfettered free agency nor a system in which MLB merely drafts who it wants and walks away is ideal.

There exists a special albeit complicated relationship between the country and the corporation in this case. If the players involved are going to tweak it, why not tweak it in a way that addresses everyone’s concerns, not just one party’s?

Mike Scioscia will return as Angels manager in 2016

ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 21:  Manager Mike Scioscia #14 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the dugout during batting practice before a game against the Minnesota Twins at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 21, 2015 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Jonathan Moore/Getty Images)
Photo by Jonathan Moore/Getty Images

It was assumed already, but Mike Scioscia made it official during Monday’s press conference for new general manager Billy Eppler that he will return as Angels manager in 2016.

Scioscia, the longest-tenured manager in the majors, has been at the helm with the Angels since 2000. There was a clause in his contract which allowed him to opt out after the 2015 season, but he has decided to stay put. He still has three years and $15 million on his contract, which runs through 2018.

Jerry Dipoto resigned as Angels general manager in July amid tension with Scioscia, so there were naturally questions today about what to expect with first-time GM Eppler in the fold. According to David Adler of, Scioscia isn’t concerned.

“I think we’re going to mesh very well,” Scioscia said. “If we adjust, or maybe he adjusts to some of the things, there’s going to be collaboration that’s going to make us better.”

Eppler is the fourth general manager during Scioscia’s tenure with the team.

After winning the AL West last season, the Angels finished 85-77 this season and narrowly missed the playoffs. The team hasn’t won a postseason game since 2009.

Carlos Gomez says he’ll be in lineup for Wild Card game vs. Yankees

Houston Astros' Carlos Gomez hoops after scoring a run against the Texas Rangers in the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015, in Houston. Gomez scored from third base on a Bobby Wilson passed ball. The Astros won 4-2. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
AP Photo/Pat Sullivan

Astros center fielder Carlos Gomez sat out the final series of the regular season in order to rest a strained left intercostal muscle, but there was good news coming out of a workout today in advance of Tuesday’s Wild Card game vs. the Yankees.

This has been a lingering issue for Gomez, who missed 13 straight games with the injury last month. He aggravated the strain on a throw to home plate last Wednesday and was forced to sit while the Astros fought to keep their season alive. Astros manager A.J. Hinch told reporters last week that Gomez’s injury would typically take 45-50 days to recover from, so it’s fair to wonder how productive he can be during the postseason.

Gomez mostly struggled after coming over from the Brewers at the trade deadline, batting .242 with four home runs and a .670 OPS over 41 games.