Hall of Fame announcer Vin Scully celebrates 60 years calling Dodgers games

Leave a comment

Today marks the 60th anniversary of legendary announcer Vin Scully calling Dodgers games. As usual, he had all the right words to describe the moment:

I feel only overwhelming gratitude. You feel blessed that you’ve lived that long, that you’ve been allowed to do what you love to do for that long, and that my health has held up all those years. It’s humbling to think that you’ve been that fortunate and that God has blessed you with that time.



That first team, the so-called “Boys of Summer,” that was my graduating class. I mean, look at the team then. I had Don Newcombe, Gil Hodges, Jackie Robinson, Pee Wee Reese, Billy Cox, Roy Campanella, Duke Snider, Carl Furillo, and Carl Erskine. That was such an amazing collection of players, so I guess that was the team that made the most impression on me.

Scully is 82 years old and no longer travels with the team beyond the West Coast, but remains my favorite announcer in all of baseball. In fact, he’s so good and so fun to listen to that I actually use him as motivation to exercise, putting on Dodgers games while doing late-night sessions on the elliptical machine. And if you’ve seen me, you know that’s really saying something.
I’m a lifelong Minnesotan with no strong feelings about the Dodgers and exercising is perhaps my least favorite thing in the entire world, yet Scully makes working out while watching Matt Kemp and company a treat. Here’s hoping for many more years in the broadcast booth for Scully, or at least as many as it takes for me to shed another 30 pounds or so.
Congrats, Vin. It takes someone truly special to be the best for 60 years.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images
19 Comments

Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.