The best idea I've heard all day

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Pumpsie Green.jpgCommenter CG Hudson had a great idea in the No. 42 thread this morning about how to celebrate Jackie Robinson Day next year:

This wearing of the 42 is all well and good but how about MLB getting
creative next year (I know; no chance) and having each team wear the
number of its first African American player (i.e., Indians wear Doby’s
number, Reds wear Chuck Harmon’s, etc., etc.). We all might learn a bit
more in the process.

While I don’t like that we’ve changed Washington and Lincoln’s birthday to “Presidents’ Day,” it’s not like doing what CG suggests would diminish Robinson’s legacy the way adding Richard Nixon to the party sullies George and Abe’s.  To the contrary, it honors those worthy of honor in ways they’ve never been honored before. I think it’s a great idea. I’d love it if Major League Baseball were to do this. I see only two problems:

  • The late-to-integrate teams like the Red Sox and Tigers may not much care for having their historical foot-dragging shoved in their face like this. My response: tough. History is history and part of that history is exposing who, historically speaking, was slow to come to see the light. Just because Tom Yawkey was a racist doesn’t mean we shouldn’t celebrate Pumpsie Green. And besides, all the people who fought integration are either long dead or at least long out of control of the teams they worked for or owned at the time, so who cares what they think?
  • The second problem is that there are now 14 more teams in the league than there were in 1947, and all of them were integrated from Day One of their existence, so it’s not entirely clear what they should do. I’m sure we can figure something out, however. Maybe they go with Robinson. Maybe they go with Negro Leagues tribute. Maybe they do something else that reflects the civil rights struggle in their particular cities. As far as problems go, it’s solvable.

Anyway, the point is to use Jackie Robinson Day to honor the history of baseball’s integration and teach people a few things. Why not change it up a bit next year and give the Curt Roberts and Bob Trices of the world their due?

And for the record. here’s a list of the first black players on every major
league team in existence at the time the color barrier was broken:

Jackie
Robinson     Dodgers
Larry Doby             Indians
Hank
Thompson      Browns
Monte Irvin             Giants
Hank
Thompson      Giants (same day as Irvin; Thompson integrated two teams!
Sam
Jethroe           Braves
Minnie Minoso        White Sox
Bob Trice
              Athletics
Ernie Banks           Cubs
Curt Roberts
          Pirates
Tom Alston             Cardinals
Nino
Escalera         Reds
Chuck Harmon        Reds (same day as Escalera)
Carlos
Paula           Senators
Elston Howard         Yankees
John
Kennedy         Phillies
Ozzie Virgil, Sr.       Tigers
Pumpsie
Green        Red Sox

Make it happen, Bud!

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: