Orioles' manager Dave Trembley is in trouble

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How do you know that? Because people who know things — people like Ken Rosenthal — are talking about who should replace him.  Rosenthal’s choice: Phil Garner. He notes that Andy MacPhail interviewed Garner when MacPhail was president of the Cubs.

I was rather surprised that Trembley was even brought back for 2010. He’s a nice fellow and someone you might want to have around when young players first break into the bigs, you know, so as not to scare them or something, but there’s a fine line between being a friendly welcoming face and perpetuating, however inadvertently, a culture that everything’s OK, win or lose. If Trembley has motivational skills they’ve eluded everyone who watches and writes about the team. He reminds me of a more sedate Ned Yost if such a thing is possible.

Firing the manager is always an exercise in scapegoating to some degree, but the Orioles don’t want for talent at the moment. It’s too early to expect them to contend, but it’s not too early for them to be playing sharper baseball, and it’s never a good time for them to be comfortable with losing, which many Orioles fans think this team is quickly becoming.

Is Phil Garner the answer? Eh, I was never a big fan of his, and there’s a danger in overreacting by bringing in rah-rah guys like him and Larry Bowa and their ilk.  But it’s not like anyone expected Trembley to still be around when this team finally does contend. To the contrary, even if the team was doing better right now, he’ll long have accepted a roving instructor or special assistant job within the organization by then for being the dutiful organizational solider he has been, having been replaced by a guy with some experience with a winning team.

And really, something has to change in Baltimore, if for no other reason than to give the fans something to care about for a while.

Multiple Miami Marlins passed on joining Jose Fernandez on that boat

JUPITER, FL - FEBRUARY 24: Pitcher Jose Fernandez of the Miami Marlins poses for photos on media day at Roger Dean Stadium on February 24, 2016 in Jupiter, Florida. (Photo by Marc Serota/Getty Images)
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A brutal couple of updates on the night of Jose Fernandez’s death from Jeff Passan of Yahoo and from Andre Fernandez of the Miami Herald.

Passan reports on the leadup to the fateful boat trip. About how a friend of one of the other men killed on the boat had pleaded with him not to go out in the dark. Then there’s this:

After Saturday’s game, Fernandez had asked a number of teammates to join him on the boat. One by one, they declined.

Marcell Ozuna was one of them. Andre Fernandez of the Miami Herald reports:

Following Monday’s game, Ozuna said he turned down an invitation from Fernandez after Saturday night’s game to go out with him and join him for a spin on his boat . . . “That night I told him, ‘Don’t go out,’” Ozuna said. “Everybody knew he was crazy about that boat and loved being out on the water. I told him I couldn’t go out that night because I had the kids and my wife waiting for me.

Losing a friend and teammate under such circumstances is brutal enough. Adding on survivor’s guilt would be close to impossible to bear.

David Ortiz: “I was born to play against the Yankees”

BOSTON, MA - APRIL 29:  David Ortiz  #34 of the Boston Red Sox celebrates after hitting a two-run home run in the eighth inning during the game against the New York Yankees at Fenway Park on April 29, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)
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David Ortiz has used Derek Jeter’s Player’s Tribune as his personal podium all year as he says goodbye to the Major Leagues. He continues that today, on the eve of his final series against the Yankees.

In it Ortiz talks about what playing the Yankees meant to him over the course of his career. About how the fan hate was real but something he embraced. About how the series back in the days of Jeter and Pettitte and Mariano and Mussina were “wars.” He also talks about how the Yankees were basically everything when he was growing up in the Dominican Republic. The only caps and shirts you saw were Yankees shirts and how they were about the only team you could see on TV there. As such, coming to Boston and then playing against the Yankees was a big, big deal.

Ortiz says “[s]ome players are born to be Yankees, you know what I’m saying? I was born to play against the Yankees.”

And he’ll get to do it only three more times.