Orlando Hudson suggests racism is the reason Jermaine Dye doesn't have a job

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Yahoo!’s Jeff Passan and Orlando Hudson spoke yesterday about this Thursday’s Jackie Robinson Day and about the still-unemployed Jermaine Dye. Culture warriors: let’s get ready to rumble:

You’ve got some guys who miss a year who can come back and get $5, $6
million, and a guy like Jermaine Dye can’t get a job. A guy like Gary Sheffield,
a first-ballot Hall of Famer, can’t get a job . . . We both know what it is. You’ll get it right. You’ll figure it out.
I’m not gonna say it because then I’ll be in [trouble] . . . Call it what you want to. I ain’t fit to say it. After I
retire I’ll say it. I’ve got a whole bunch of stuff to say after I

Many will immediately dismiss this, especially in light of the news that Dye received — and rejected — yet another offer recently, this time from the Washington Nationals. Before doing so, it’s worth reading Passan’s take which, while not endorsing Hudson’s views on the merits, puts them in context. The upshot: Hudson is not a lone nut crying racism here. There are others who have done so recently, and it’s reflective of a chasm of perception between black ballplayers and the game’s power structure that needs to be addressed.  It’s a good point.

As for the merits, personally I’m an Occam’s Razor guy. I don’t think it’s as clean or easy to explain Jermaine Dye’s unemployment as a racist thing as I think it is to explain it within the context of a set of financial realities in baseball that (a) has severely depressed the value of aging sluggers with little defensive value like Dye; and (b) may, depending on who you believe, have a collusive element to it all.  Jim Edmonds and Mike Sweeney have jobs and Jermaine Dye doesn’t, but I suspect that has less to do with race than the fact that Jim Edmonds and Mike Sweeney were willing to take $850K and $650K, respectively, and Jermaine Dye is not.

Not that I think the financial aspects to all of this will be seriously considered as talk radio guys rush to pillory Orlando Hudson of being the second baseman who cried racism.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.