Johan Santana would ditch the Mets if he could

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Johan Santana dugout.jpgIan O’Connor is now a columnist for ESPN New York, but who knew that he also moonlights as Madam Ruby?

So two seasons and two starts later, after knee and elbow surgeries,
after his new team choked in Year 1, collapsed in Year 2 and finished
its sixth home game of Year 3 with a lost series to the unworthy
Nationals and a 2-4 record, I asked Santana if he regretted doing
business with the Mets.

Had his water been spiked with truth
serum, his answer would’ve sounded like this: “What do
you think?”

He goes on:

Yes, Santana has to be wondering what in the world he’s gotten himself
into. He’s only human. That voice in the back of his head is growing
louder, moving to the front, telling him he should’ve put his money on a
different horse
.

There are so many things wrong with this piece that I don’t even know where to begin, but I’m mostly struck by why he would use such a tired storyline after what was only Santana’s second start of the season. Why not save this kind of junk for the middle of the summer since O’Connor surely believes the Mets are destined for another fourth place finish, or worse?

Long story short, if O’Connor tells you that your missing bike is in the basement of The Alamo, promptly ask for your money back.

(Hat tip to MetsBlog for the link)

Yoenis Cespedes blames a lack of golf for his early season slump

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Back during the 2015 playoffs the sorts of New York media types who love to find reasons to criticize players for petty reasons decided to criticize Yoenis Cespedes for playing golf the day of a playoff game. The Mets won the series with the Cubs during which the controversy, such as it was, occurred and it was soon dropped.

It was picked back up again in 2016 when Cespedes, while on the disabled list with a strained quad, was seen playing golf. Despite the fact that everyone involved said that golf did not contribute to his injury and that golf would have no impact on his injured quad, it was deemed “a bad look” by a columnist looking to get some mileage out of bashing Cespedes for having a hobby that probably half of all ballplayers share. They did it when he showed off his fancy cars too, by the way, even though just about every ballplayer has a fancy car or three. When you’re a superstar in New York — especially when you’re one with whom the media is not particularly close for various reasons — you’re going to catch hell for seemingly nothing.

Now there’s a new twist to the Cespedes golf saga. Yoenis himself says that his poor start — he’s hitting .195/.258/.354 and leads the league in strikeouts — is due to . . . not enough golf! From the New York Times:

He gave a possible reason for the poor start this weekend: not playing enough golf, a hobby beloved by many baseball players. And, yes, he is serious.

“In previous seasons, one of the things I did when I wasn’t going well was to play golf,” he said after a game on Friday in which he struck out four times but still drove in the go-ahead run in the 12th inning. “This year, I’m not playing golf.”

The story says Cespedes quit golf last summer because he worried that it was contributing to hamstring problems. He’s thinking about going back to it soon, as he thinks it’ll help his swing. Given that he’ll catch hell either way, he may as well do what he wants.