Remember when people thought AT&T Park was going to be a bandbox?

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AT&T Park.jpgIn my Twins preview I wondered how Target Field will play this season. We get a chance to see it in action on Monday. But based on Henry Schulman’s excellent walk down AT&T Park memory lane in today’s San Francisco Chronicle, we shouldn’t necessarily take what we see in the early going at face value:

For three months, everyone thought it would be great for hitters and
death for pitchers.In January, even before there was grass on the field, the Giants took
batting practice at what was then Pacific Bell Park on a foggy but
windless day. Bonds kept hammering balls over the right-field wall and
ended his session a happy man.

On April 1, 2000, the Giants played a night exhibition against the
Yankees, also on a windless night. Bonds christened McCovey Cove with
one of six homers hit that night.

In the regular-season home opener 10 days later, a 6-5 Dodgers
victory, 35-year-old Los Angeles shortstop Kevin Elster hit three home
runs, two off Rueter and one off Felix Rodriguez. Only four times in 12
previous seasons had Elster hit two in a game.

I remember Elster hitting those three homers, as it was nationally-televised. My first thought: total bandbox.  While AT&T doesn’t depress runs quite as much as it did a few years ago, it’s certainly not a hitter’s paradise.

Most people who know things about park effects know that you can’t get a good read on how a park plays for at least a couple of years. So, even though it’s the small-sample size season (Will Big Papi ever hit the ball again?!) we shouldn’t draw any conclusions from Target Field’s first few days. Or months. Or really even the year.

Will Middlebrooks carted off field with injury

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Phillies third baseman Will Middlebrooks suffered a serious injury during Saturday’s Grapefruit League contest against the Orioles. The infielder was chasing down a pop fly in the eighth inning when he ran into left fielder Andrew Pullin, who inadvertently trapped Middlebrooks’ ankle under his leg. Middlebrooks was unable to put weight on his leg following the collision and was carted off the field and taken to a local hospital for X-rays.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, not much is known yet about the severity of the ankle injury or the recovery time it will require, though it appears serious enough to set Middlebrooks back considerably as he seeks a backup/bench role with the team this spring.

The 29-year-old is currently seeking another opportunity to extend his six-year major-league career in 2018. He’s coming off of two down years with the Brewers and Rangers, during which he slashed a cumulative .169/.229/.262 with four extra bases through 70 plate appearances.