Nick Adenhart: One year later

Leave a comment

Nick Adenhart large.jpgOne year ago this morning we woke up to the news of Nick Adenhart’s death. As Lyle Spencer of MLB.com reports, the Angels are still working through it all. “The shock … I don’t think you ever get over the shock,” Jered Weaver said. “Any time you bring it up, it’s there.”

The Angels will award Weaver with the inaugural Nick Adenhart Award tonight, which will henceforth go to the team’s most valuable pitcher. And with that, the formal part of the grieving process will end. Gone will be the reminders that were everywhere last year: his
locker preserved in game-day condition. His jersey hanging in the
dugout. His number on the outfield wall.

Personally, I don’t do well with this sort of thing. I don’t mean death itself. I can deal with the actual death of someone close to me as well as someone can be expected to deal with it under the circumstances.

The hardest part for me is the expected and inevitable return to normalcy. When the person’s clothes and possessions are disposed of. When you change the entry in the address book from “Husband and Wife Smith” to merely “Wife Smith.” When you serve a meal and, for the first time, someone feels comfortable taking the dead person’s seat at the table. Those are the kinds of things that truly cause the loss to set in for me. They underscore the finality and, in some cases, tragedy of it all in ways that affect me far more than the initial moment of shock and the first few days and weeks of grieving do.

The Angels are now returning to normalcy. For those on the team closest to him, Nick Adenhart will necessarily transform from a source of raw, immediate and visceral inspiration to something different. And in some subtle but important ways, that may be harder to deal with than what they went through last year.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

Abbie Parr/Getty Images
3 Comments

Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.