The umps blow a would-be replay moment in the Cubs-Braves game

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Piniella argues.jpgI’ve noticed a lot of great camera work in the first two days of the baseball season. That ESPN matrix-vision thing they used to show the double-steal on Sunday night was pretty spiffy. That Mark Buehrle gem was covered from a zillion angles. Also captured really well?  Nate McLouth having the ball pop out of his glove as he made a diving non-catch on Marlon Byrd’s shot to center in the sixth inning of yesterday’s Braves-Cubs game. There was an umpire huddle, but despite the fact that 53,000 fans in the ballpark could see the non-catch on the jumbotron and millions of viewers at home could see the same thing, the original call — out — held up.

I don’t want Lou Piniella to be able to throw a beanbag out onto the field to challenge that, nor do the umpires or any right-thinking fans.  But how easy would it be to have umpire #5 — with his generously-sized tushy resting comfortably on an Aeron chair in front of a couple of TVs up in the press box — simply buzz the crew chief on his walkie-talkie, say “hey, I know it was easy for you to miss because it happened on the upstage side of McLouth’s body, but the ball squirted out,” and have the correct call made? It would have taken 11 seconds.

The umpires would get credit for making the right call. More importantly, the right call is made. Seems pretty obvious, doesn’t it?

Enrique Hernandez’s performance one for the record books

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Entering Thursday’s NLCS Game 5, Dodgers outfielder Enrique Hernandez had never hit a home run nor even driven in a run in the playoffs in his four-year career. He had homered twice in a regular season game just twice and his career-high for RBI in a game was four.

Hernandez hit three home runs and knocked in seven runs to help power the Dodgers past the Cubs 11-1 to win the National League pennant and punch their ticket to the World Series. His first homer was a solo homer to center field in the second inning off of starter Jose Quintana. He blasted a grand slam to right field off of Hector Rondon in the fourth, then tacked on a two-run blast in the ninth inning off of Mike Montgomery to make it 11-1.

Hernandez is the 10th player to hit three home runs in a postseason game. Jose Altuve, of course, did it two weeks ago in Game 1 of the ALDS against the Red Sox. Before Altuve, Pablo Sandoval (2012), Albert Pujols (2011), and Adrian Beltre (2011) were the last players to accomplish the feat.

Hernandez’s seven RBI set a new National League record for a postseason game. Only four other players — Troy O’Leary, John Valentin, Mo Vaughn, and Edgar Martinez — accomplished the feat.

No one has hit three home runs and knocked in seven-plus in a game… until Hernandez. He certainly picked a good time to break out.