27.7 percent of players on Opening Day rosters are foreign born

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Major League Baseball released some interesting data regarding player birth places, noting that the number of foreign-born players on Opening Day rosters is at a four-year low.
Of course, “four-year low” is probably misleading given that this year’s rate of 27.7 percent isn’t all that far from the all-time high of 29.2 percent in 2005. In a sample of around 825 players (30 teams with 25-man rosters, plus some guys on the disabled list) the difference between 27.7 percent and 29.2 percent is a dozen players.
This season 231 of 833 players on Opening Day rosters are foreign born, led by the Dominican Republic with 86 and Venezuela with 58. In fact, if you remove the United States and Venezuela from the mix there are as many players from the Dominican Republic as there are from every other country combined.
Pretty amazing for a country that ranks 80th in total population with around 10 million (or roughly the same as Michigan, Georgia, and North Carolina). Torii Hunter was unavailable for comment. Meanwhile, the Mets have the most foreign-born players with 18, and the only other teams in double digits are the Cubs, Angels, Rockies, Dodgers, and Rangers.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.