This is going to be Andy Pettitte's last year

Leave a comment

Not that this is shocking news or anything, but in an interview with YES , Andy Pettitte has all but announced that he’s done after 2010:

“I can’t just keep on playing,” Pettitte said. “I need to get back
home . . . There are so many things going on back home and I’m not there. I can’t keep asking my wife to take care of everything.”

It’s a story I’m surprised you don’t hear more of in baseball. I’m sure the winters off and the $100 million helps a lot, but how anyone can maintain a stable and healthy family life with the schedule of a major league baseball player is beyond me. At the end of the day you kinda gotta be there.

In other news, this story is written by Jack Curry, late of the New York Times.  Jack Curry is a real good one, and I’m glad to see him taking to his new gig nicely.  Today marks the launch of ESPN New York.* As they did in all of the other cities where they’ve set up shop, they lured away talent from the local press to fill out the roster.  In New York they took guys like Ian O’Connor and Wallace Matthews.  I bet they wish they could have moved more quickly and gotten Curry instead.

*And thank God for that. Now the New York teams can finally get some coverage on ESPN.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

Getty Images
5 Comments

The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
1 Comment

If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.