Joe Nathan undergoes Tommy John surgery

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Joe Nathan headshot.jpgUPDATE: General manager Bill Smith says that Nathan’s reported “significant” UCL tear ended up being a complete tear, reports Kelsie Smith of the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

7:31 pm: The Twins have announced that Joe Nathan’s Tommy John surgery was a success, reports Joe Christensen of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. Mets (gasp!) team physician Dr. David Altcheck performed the surgery in New York on Friday.

Altcheck removed a tendon from Nathan’s left wrist and inserted it into his right
elbow, repairing his torn ulnar collateral ligament. The 35-year-old right-hander is expected to miss the entirety of the 2010 season, but should be ready to rock for the early part of the 2011 season.

Jon Rauch has the most closing experience among Nathan’s potential in-house replacements, though the club has yet to make a decision on that front. Matt Guerrier, Jesse Crain and even Francisco Liriano have been discussed as alternatives, while Jason Frasor of the Blue Jays and Heath Bell of the Padres are reportedly available via trade.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.