Will the international draft hurt Dominican baseball like it hurt baseball in Puerto Rico?

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Thumbnail image for dominican republic flag.jpgI’m opposed to the the imposition of an international draft during the next round of collective bargaining for a few reasons. For one thing, I think it will be a logistical and political nightmare, as would anything that requires even the tacit participation of a guy like Hugo Chavez. I also tend to find it unseemly that a bunch of guys — current players — are able and willing to toss the rights of teenagers in other countries over the side at a U.S. collective bargaining table. I’ll grant, however, that those issues are more philosophical than practical, so it’s not like I expect anyone to take them too seriously.

More practically and more significantly, I worry that an international draft would eliminate the incentive for major league teams to go out and work hard to
develop amateurs in places like the Dominican
Republic, building academies and the like. I mean, why would they make such an investment if they would have absolutely no inside track to any of the talent they find there? If you’re the Astros, are you really going to want to see the Cardinals draft the talent you discovered and developed? Of course not.  And this isn’t just hypothetical. Look at Puerto Rico. Before 1990, there was no draft there, and all kinds of
Puerto Rican talent flowed into the Major Leagues. Since then: baseball
has declined horribly in Puerto Rico
, and most observers blame the draft.

But perhaps my concerns on this have been overstated.  ESPN’s Jorge Arangure has a take on this today that’s definitely worth a read.  In it he argues that the fate which befell amateur baseball in Puerto Rico won’t necessarily happen to the Dominican Republic because baseball and its attendant income is simply much more important to people in the latter than in the former:

Could what happened in Puerto Rico happen in the Dominican?

simple answer is that it doesn’t seem as likely. The difference lies in
economics. An international draft will almost surely bring down bonus
amounts, but that will have less of an impact in the Dominican where
nearly half of the residents live under the poverty line and the Gross
Domestic Product per capita is in the $5,000-$8,500 range, depending on
the source. This means that claiming even a $5,000-$10,000 signing bonus will have a
substantial affect on a family in the Dominican, much more so than it
would in Puerto Rico where the GDP per capita is around $18,000.

I hadn’t considered the monetary angle of it.  Is the greater need to earn an living from baseball in the Dominican Republic enough to overcome the disincentive on the part of the teams to find talent?  Hard to say, but it may be. It certainly could work to lessen the impact of development divestment on the part of the teams. Of course, it may increase the profile of buscones too, as someone is going to have to find that talent when the ballclubs reign in their development budgets to concentrate on players closer to draft age as opposed to finding younger players they wish to woo.

I still remain opposed to an international draft — those philosophical objections still nag — but Arangure’s article has certainly made me rethink the competitive impacts of such a beast a bit.  As we get closer to the new CBA negotiations, I’ll continue to rethink and (gasp!) research it a bit more.

Drew Pomeranz does not need arm surgery

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 10:  Drew Pomeranz #31 of the Boston Red Sox throws a pitch in the fifth inning against the Cleveland Indians during game three of the American League Divison Series at Fenway Park on October 10, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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Red Sox lefty Drew Pomeranz was of limited utility during the postseason as he began experiencing soreness in his left forearm near the end of the 2016 season. There was some thought that he might need offseason surgery but Pomeranz was examined by doctors who determined that he does not need any surgery, Evan Drellich of the Boston Herald reports. President of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said:

He has seen the doctor, the doctor looked at him. I can’t really disclose totally everything that was done, but the doctor said no surgical procedure and the doctor feels he will be ready for next spring training for us.

Pomeranz, 27, finished the 2016 regular season with an aggregate 3.32 ERA and a 186/65 K/BB ratio in 170 2/3 innings between the Padres and Red Sox. He operated out of the bullpen during the playoffs, allowing two runs on four hits and two walks with seven strikeouts over 3 2/3 innings.

The Red Sox acquired Pomeranz in a trade with the Padres in July. It was a trade that earned Padres GM A.J. Preller a 30-day suspension from Major League Baseball, as he reportedly kept two sets of medical records in order to deceive trade partners.

Pirates promote Joey Cora to third base coach

KANSAS CITY, MO - APRIL 7:  Third Base Coach Joey Cora #28 of the Chicago White Sox looks on during the game against the Kansas City Royals at Kauffman Stadium on April 7, 2004 in Kansas City, Missouri. The White Sox won 4-3.  (Photo by Dave Kaup/Getty Images)
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After managing the Pirates’ Double-A affiliate to a 76-64 record this past season, the organization has promoted Joey Cora to third base coach for the major league club, Cory Giger of the Altoona Mirror reports. The Pirates fired previous third base coach Rick Sofield over the weekend.

Cora, 51, has plenty of coaching experience since retiring as a player in 1998. In the majors, he coached for the White Sox from 2004-11 and for the Marlins in 2012.

Cora briefly served as interim manager for the Marlins in 2012 when Ozzie Guillen was suspended, but has otherwise not been given a managerial position yet. He interviewed with the Brewers after the 2010 season and was a finalist but the organization ultimately chose Ron Roenicke. It’s easy to see Cora being a manager in the very near future, however.