Royals' utilityman's road trip pays dividends for his son

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There’s a new player on the NHL’s Minnesota Wild who has baseball to thank for his hockey career. He’s Casey Wellman, the son of former Giants and Royals’ utilityman Brad Wellman, and he got his start, indirectly anyway, on a Royals’ road trip:

In 1988, the Royals were in Boston to play the Red Sox when the Bruins
were hosting the New Jersey Devils in the Prince of Wales conference
finals. The Devils trainer was buddies with the Royals trainer and
invited Brad Wellman and Royals teammate Kevin Seitzer to Boston Garden
for a morning skate.

In the locker room, Wellman was invited onto
the ice. “But I didn’t know how to skate,” Brad Wellman said. “That
bothered me, so when I got back home after the year, I learned how to
skate and then (Casey and brother Logan) came and they were pretty

Coolest thing I learned in all of this?  Brad Wellman’s Baseball-Reference page says that he’s Tom Candiotti’s brother in law.  Tom Candiotti played Hoyt Wilhelm in *61, alongside Bruce McGill, who played Ralph Houk.  McGill, of course, played D-Day in “Animal House,” which means that Casey Wellman has a Bacon number of 3.

Which is probably pretty low for a guy in the NHL.

(thanks to Neate Sager for the link)

Chris Sale will start on Opening Day for Red Sox

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No surprise here: Chris Sale will start on Opening Day for the Red Sox, Pete Abraham of The Boston Globe reports. The Red Sox open the season on March 29 in Tampa Bay against the Rays. Sale will oppose Chris Archer.

Sale, 28, is the fifth different Opening Day starter the Red Sox have had in as many years, preceded by Rick Porcello, David Price, Clay Buchholz, and Jon Lester. Sale started on Opening Day for the White Sox in 2013, ’14, and ’16.

Sale finished second in AL Cy Young Award balloting last year and finished ninth for AL MVP. He went 17-8 with a 2.90 ERA and a 308/43 K/BB ratio in 214 1/3 innings. Sale and Clayton Kershaw (2015) are the only pitchers to strike out 300 or more batters in a season dating back to 2003.